LiU Electronic Press
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Author:
Magnusson, Martin (Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, KPLAB - Knowledge Processing Lab) (Linköping University, The Institute of Technology)
Doherty, Patrick (Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, KPLAB - Knowledge Processing Lab) (Linköping University, The Institute of Technology)
Title:
Temporal Action Logic for Question Answering in an Adventure Game
Department:
Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, KPLAB - Knowledge Processing Lab
Linköping University, The Institute of Technology
Publication type:
Conference paper (Refereed)
Language:
English
In:
Artificial General Intelligence, AGI 2008
Conference:
First Conference on Artificial General Intelligence (AGI 2008), 1-3 March 2008, Memphis, TN, USA
Place of publ.: Amsterdam, Netherlands Publisher: IOS Press
Series:
Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence and Applications, ISSN 0922-6389; 15
Pages:
236-247
Year of publ.:
2008
URI:
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-44573
Permanent link:
http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-44573
ISBN:
978-1-58603-833-5
ISI:
000273520300020
Local ID:
77116
Subject category:
Computer Science
SVEP category:
Computer science
Keywords(en) :
Temporal Action Logic; computer games; natural language understanding; artificial general intelligence; natural deduction; planning; epistemic reasoning
Abstract(en) :

Inhabiting the complex and dynamic environments of modern computer games with autonomous agents capable of intelligent timely behaviour is a significant research challenge. We illustrate this using Our own attempts to build a practical agent architecture on it logicist foundation. In the ANDI-Land adventure game concept players solve puzzles by eliciting information from computer characters through natural language question answering. While numerous challenges immediately presented themselves, they took on a form of concrete and accessible problems to solve, and we present some of our initial solutions. We conclude that games, due to their demand for human-like computer characters with robust and independent operation in large simulated worlds, might serve as excellent test beds for research towards artificial general intelligence.

Available from:
2009-10-10
Created:
2009-10-10
Last updated:
2013-06-26
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43 hits