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Correlation between Genetic and Geographic Structure in Europe
Department of Forensic Molecular Biology, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, 3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands.
Institut für Medizinische Informatik und Statistik, Christian-Albrechts University Kiel, D-24105 Kiel, Germany.
Institut für Medizinische Informatik und Statistik, Christian-Albrechts University Kiel, D-24105 Kiel, Germany.
Institut für Medizinische Informatik und Statistik, Christian-Albrechts University Kiel, D-24105 Kiel, Germany.
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2008 (English)In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 18, no 16, 1241-1248 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding the genetic structure of the European population is important, not only from a historical perspective, but also for the appropriate design and interpretation of genetic epidemiological studies. Previous population genetic analyses with autosomal markers in Europe either had a wide geographic but narrow genomic coverage [1, 2], or vice versa [3-6]. We therefore investigated Affymetrix GeneChip 500K genotype data from 2,514 individuals belonging to 23 different subpopulations, widely spread over Europe. Although we found only a low level of genetic differentiation between subpopulations, the existing differences were characterized by a strong continent-wide correlation between geographic and genetic distance. Furthermore, mean heterozygosity was larger, and mean linkage disequilibrium smaller, in southern as compared to northern Europe. Both parameters clearly showed a clinal distribution that provided evidence for a spatial continuity of genetic diversity in Europe. Our comprehensive genetic data are thus compatible with expectations based upon European population history, including the hypotheses of a south-north expansion and/or a larger effective population size in southern than in northern Europe. By including the widely used CEPH from Utah (CEU) samples into our analysis, we could show that these individuals represent northern and western Europeans reasonably well, thereby confirming their assumed regional ancestry. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 18, no 16, 1241-1248 p.
Keyword [en]
EVOL_ECOL, HUM_DISEASE
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Natural Sciences Medical and Health Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-45434DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2008.07.049OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-45434DiVA: diva2:266330
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13

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Holmlund, Gunilla

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