liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Independent roles of the dachshund and eyes absent genes in BMP signaling, axon pathfinding and neuronal specification
Department of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School, 220 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, United States, Division of Biology-IFM, Linkoping University, Campus Valla, 581 83 Linkoping, Sweden.
Department of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School, 220 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, United States, Department of Neurology, The Children's Hospital, 320 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, United States.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5095-541X
2004 (English)In: Development, ISSN 0950-1991, E-ISSN 1477-9129, Vol. 131, no 23, 5837-5848 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the Drosophila nerve cord, a subset of neurons expresses the neuropeptide FMRFamide related (Fmrf). Fmrf expression is controlled by a combinatorial code of intrinsic factors and an extrinsic BMP signal. However, this previously identified code does not fully explain the regulation of Fmrf. We have found that the Dachshund (Dac) and Eyes Absent (Eya) transcription co-factors participate in this combinatorial code. Previous studies have revealed an intimate link between Dac and Eya during eye development. Here, by analyzing their function in neurons with multiple phenotypic markers, we demonstrate that they play independent roles in neuronal specification, even within single cells. dac is required for high-level Fmrf expression, and acts potently together with apterous and BMP signaling to trigger Fmrf expression ectopically, even in motoneurons. By contrast, eya regulates Fmrf expression by controlling both axon pathfinding and BMP signaling, but cannot trigger Fmrf ectopically. Thus, we show that dac and eya perform entirely different functions in a single cell type to ultimately regulate a single phenotypic outcome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2004. Vol. 131, no 23, 5837-5848 p.
Keyword [en]
BMP signaling, Combinatorial code, Dachshund, Drosophila, Eyes absent, FMRFa, FMRFamide
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-45566DOI: 10.1242/dev.01447OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-45566DiVA: diva2:266462
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2016-11-30

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Thor, Stefan

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Thor, Stefan
By organisation
BiologyThe Institute of Technology
In the same journal
Development
Natural Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 64 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf