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Formation of chloromethoxybenzaldehyde during composting of organic household waste
Department of Soil Sciences, Swed. Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7014, SE-750 07, Uppsala, Sweden.
Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management .
Department of Soil Sciences, Swed. Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7014, SE-750 07, Uppsala, Sweden.
2004 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, Vol. 56, no 5, 475-480 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Standardized household waste was mixed with different litter amendments, straw, leaves, hardwood shavings, softwood shavings, paper, and sphagnum peat, resulting in six compost mixtures. In addition non-amended household waste was composted. Composting was done in small rotatable bins and compost samples were taken on a regular basis until day 590. Extraction and analysis of wet compost samples showed no evidence for the presence of chloroorganic compounds. Drying and re-wetting of compost samples, however, revealed that chloromethoxybenzaldehyde (CMBA) was formed in all composts at concentrations varying between 5.6 and 73.4 µgkg-1 dry matter. CMBA was not present in the original materials. During composting, there was a clear positive relation between formation of CMBA and microbial activity, as indicated by C losses and temperature. Formation took place during the most intensive phase of composting when C losses were highest. Under anaerobic conditions, however, which prevailed initially in the non-amended compost, no CMBA was formed. Calculation of total amounts of CMBA in composts revealed that there was a small decrease during storage in the hardwood, peat, and softwood composts. However, all composts contained CMBA after 590 days. The mean concentration was 33.4 µgkg-1 dry matter (s.d.=21.9). Possible biocidal effects of composts when used in cultivation may be explainable by the presence of natural toxic compounds formed during composting. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2004. Vol. 56, no 5, 475-480 p.
Keyword [en]
Chlorination, Litter amendment, Low-molecular organic compounds, Natural biocide, Sample pre-treatment
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-45671DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2004.04.040OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-45671DiVA: diva2:266567
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2011-01-12

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Hjelm, Olof

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