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Sagittal plane translation during level walking in poor-functioning and well-functioning patients with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3527-5488
2004 (English)In: American Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0363-5465, E-ISSN 1552-3365, Vol. 32, no 5, 1250-1255 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Some patients with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency can function well and participate in high-level sports, whereas others have functional limitations even during activities of daily living. Hypothesis: Patients who function well after an anterior cruciate ligament injury can stabilize the knee joint during gait by an anterior positioning of the tibia. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Sagittal tibial translation was registered with the CA-4000 electrogoniometer, during the Lachman test and walking, in 20 patients with a unilateral anterior cruciate ligament injury. Eleven patients functioned well (Lysholm score =84), and 9 patients had poor knee function (Lysholm score <84). Results: During gait, the well-functioning group had 24% greater anterior translation in the injured leg compared to the noninjured leg. In the poor-functioning group, the anterior translation in the injured leg was 16% smaller compared to the noninjured leg (P = .0003). Tibial translation during the Lachman test was similar in the injured leg in the 2 groups. Conclusion: Patients who function well position their tibiae near the anterior border of the joint play. This position may encourage functional stability. Clinical Relevance: Rehabilitation that emphasizes training to stabilize the tibia in an anterior position may improve functional stability of the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2004. Vol. 32, no 5, 1250-1255 p.
Keyword [en]
Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), Biomechanics, Compensators, Functional stability, Knee kinematics
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-45701DOI: 10.1177/0363546503262173OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-45701DiVA: diva2:266597
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13

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Kvist, Joanna

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