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A long-term perspective on the protective effects of an early invasive strategy in unstable coronary artery disease: Two-year follow-up of the FRISC-II Invasive Study
Department of Cardiology, University Hospital, S-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
Department of Cardiology, University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
Heart and Lung Centre, Ullevål University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Näslund, U., Department of Cardiology, Heart Centre, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
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2002 (English)In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 40, no 11, 1902-1914 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: We sought to report the first and repeat events and to separate spontaneous and procedure-related events over two years in the Fast Revascularization during InStability in Coronary artery disease (FRISC-II) invasive trial. BACKGROUND: The FRISC-II invasive trial compared the long-term effects of an early invasive versus noninvasive strategy, in terms of death and myocardial infarction (MI) and the need for repeat hospital admissions and late revascularization procedures in patients with coronary artery disease (UCAD). METHODS: In the FRISC-II trial, 2,457 patients with UCAD were randomized to an early invasive or noninvasive strategy. RESULTS: At 24 month follow-up, there were reductions in mortality (n = 45 [3.7%] vs. 67 [5.4%], risk ratio 0.68 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47 to 0.98], p = 0.038), MI (n = 111 [9.2%] vs. 156 [12.7%], risk ratio 0.72 [95% CI 0.57 to 0.91], p = 0.005), and the composite end point of death or MI (n = 146 [12.1%] vs. 200 [16.3%], risk ratio 0.74 [95% CI 0.61 to 0.90], p = 0.003) in the invasive compared with the noninvasive group. Procedure-related MIs were two to three times more common, but spontaneous ones were three times less common in the invasive than in the noninvasive group. After the first year, there was no difference in mortality (n = 20 [1.7%]) between the two groups and fewer MIs in the invasive group (p = 0.031). CONCLUSIONS: In UCAD, the early invasive approach leads to a sustained reduction in mortality, cardiac morbidity, and the need for repeat hospital admissions and late revascularization procedures. Although the benefits are greatest during the first months, during the second year, cardiac morbidity is lower and the need for hospital care is less in the invasive group. © 2002 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002. Vol. 40, no 11, 1902-1914 p.
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Medical and Health Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-46788DOI: 10.1016/S0735-1097(02)02572-XOAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-46788DiVA: diva2:267684
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13

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