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Hot flushes in men: Prevalence and possible mechanisms
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
2002 (English)In: Journal of the British Menopause Society, ISSN 1362-1807, Vol. 8, no 2, 57-62 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In men treated with castration because of prostatic carcinoma hot flushes are as common as in women after menopause. Flushes also occur in normal ageing men, but the prevalence is unknown. Hot flushes are probably caused by an instability in the thermo-regulatory centre, because of decreased sex hormone concentrations. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is involved in menopausal hot flushes in women and possibly in men with castrational therapy. Serotonin may also be implicated. Alternative treatments for hot flushes are needed, since men with prostatic carcinoma may not be treated with testosterone, and oestrogen therapy in men has many draw-backs. Therefore, development of a CGRP-antagonist may be useful. In conclusion vasomotor symptoms are common in men with castrational therapy and also exist in normal, ageing men. Since CGRP, serotonin and a decrease in sex steroids seem to be involved in hot flushes, the mechanisms behind hot flushes in men and women may be similar.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002. Vol. 8, no 2, 57-62 p.
Keyword [en]
Andrology, Calcitonin gene-related peptide, Castration, Hot flushes, Prostatic neoplasms
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-46939DOI: 10.1258/136218002100321668OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-46939DiVA: diva2:267835
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2011-01-13

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Spetz, Anna-ClaraHammar, Mats

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