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Ion implantation of silicon carbide
Hallén, A., Department of Electronics, Royal Institute of Technology, P.O. Box Electrum 229, S 164 40 Kista, Sweden.
Department of Electronics, Royal Institute of Technology, P.O. Box Electrum 229, S 164 40 Kista, Sweden.
Department of Electronics, Royal Institute of Technology, P.O. Box Electrum 229, S 164 40 Kista, Sweden.
Åberg, D., Department of Electronics, Royal Institute of Technology, P.O. Box Electrum 229, S 164 40 Kista, Sweden.
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2002 (English)In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms, ISSN 0168-583X, E-ISSN 1872-9584, Vol. 186, no 1-4, 186-194 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ion implantation is an important technique for a successful implementation of commercial SiC devices. Much effort has also been devoted to optimising implantation and annealing parameters to improve the electrical device characteristics. However, there is a severe lack of understanding of the fundamental implantation process and the generation and annealing kinetics of point defects and defect complexes. Only very few of the most elementary intrinsic point defects have been unambiguously identified so far. To reach a deeper understanding of the basic mechanisms SiC samples have been implanted with a broad range of ions, energies, doses, etc., and the resulting defects and damage produced in the lattice have been studied with a multitude of characterisation techniques. In this contribution we will review some of the results generated recently and also try to indicate where more research is needed. In particular, deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) has been used to investigate point defects at very low doses and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) are used for studying the damage build-up at high doses. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002. Vol. 186, no 1-4, 186-194 p.
Keyword [en]
Annealing, Damage, Dislocation loops, Dose rate, Point defects
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-47150DOI: 10.1016/S0168-583X(01)00880-1OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-47150DiVA: diva2:268046
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13

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Persson, PerCarlsson, FredrikStorasta, LiutaurasBergman, Peder

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Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms
Engineering and Technology

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