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Early cognitive and behavioral predictors of later performance: A follow-up study of ELBW children from ages 2 to 4
Helsinki Univ. Hosp. Children A., Neurology, Helsinki, Finland.
Helsinki Univ. Hosp. Children A., Psychiatry, Helsinki, Finland.
Von Wendt, L., Helsinki Univ. Hosp. Children A., Neurology, Helsinki, Finland.
2001 (English)In: Early Childhood Research Quarterly, ISSN 0885-2006, E-ISSN 1873-7706, Vol. 16, no 3, 343-361 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to examine whether behavioral style and cognitive performance predict cognitive development in ELBW children. The children were assessed at age 2 (40 girls, 41 boys) with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development. At age 4 they were assessed with the WPPSI-R, and with the word fluency, visual attention and recognition of incomplete figures subsets of the Finnish Neuropsychological Investigation for Children (NEPSY-R, Korkman et al. 1997). The results indicated that there was stability in cognitive performance from 2 to 4 years of age. Along with cognitive performance, behavioral style, especially orientation-engagement at age 2, was an important predictor of subsequent cognitive performance (WPPSI-R). Significant gender differences were also found. For boys, orientation-engagement factor at time one was the best predictor of subsequent nonverbal cognitive performance, arithmetical abilities and word fluency at time two. In contrast, girls' cognitive performance measured at the 2-year assessment was the most powerful predictor of nonverbal performance and word fluency at 4 years. As a whole, it seems that behavioral factors merit more consideration in understanding cognitive development than has been thought before. © 2001 Elsevier Science Inc.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2001. Vol. 16, no 3, 343-361 p.
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-47278DOI: 10.1016/S0885-2006(01)00107-7OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-47278DiVA: diva2:268174
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13

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