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Relative importance of sources of symptom-induced distress in urinary bladder cancer survivors
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2003 (English)In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 43, no 6, 651-662 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The influence of specific symptoms on emotions and social activities in the individual patient vanes. Little is known about this variation in urinary bladder cancer survivors (in other words, about the relative importance of sources of symptom-induced distress). Methods: We attempted to enrol 404 surgical patients treated with cystectomy and a conduit or reservoir in four Swedish towns (Stockholm, Orebro, Jonkoping, Linkoping), 101 surgical patients treated with cystectomy and orthotopic neobladder at the Herlev Hospital in Copenhagen, Denmark, and 71 patients treated with radical radiotherapy for bladder cancer, as well as 581 men and women controls in Stockholm and Copenhagen. An anonymous postal questionnaire was used to collect the information. Results: A total of 503 out of 576 (87%) treated patients and 422 out of 581 (73%) controls participated but 59 patients were excluded. The primary source of self-assessed distress among cystectomised patients was compromised sexual function, reduced intercourse frequency caused great distress in 19% of the conduit patients, 20% of the reservoir patients and 19% of the bladder substitute patients. The primary source of self-assessed distress in patients treated with radical radiotherapy was symptoms from the bowel, 17% reported great distress due to diarrhoea, 16% due to abdominal pain, 14% due to defecation urgency and 14% due to faecal leakage. The highest proportion of subjects being distressed was 93% (substantial: 43%, moderate: 29% and little: 21%) for treated upper or lower urinary retention (indwelling catheter or nephrostomy). Conclusion: The distress caused by a specific symptom varies considerably and the prevalence of symptoms causing great distress differs between treatments in bladder cancer survivors. It is possible that patient care and clinical research can be made more effective by focusing on important sources of symptom-induced distress. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. Vol. 43, no 6, 651-662 p.
Keyword [en]
bladder neoplasm, cystectomy, radiotherapy, distressful symptoms, urinary symptoms, bowel symptoms, urinary diversion, bladder substitute
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-47788DOI: 10.1016/S0302-2838(03)00135-0OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-47788DiVA: diva2:268684
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13

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Ahlstrand, Christer

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Faculty of Health SciencesUrology Department of Urology in Östergötland
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