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Sex differences in risk factor control off treated hypertensives: a national primary healthcare-based study in Sweden
Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol, Ctr Family & Community Med, Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden .
Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol, Ctr Family & Community Med, Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden .
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice.
Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol, Ctr Family & Community Med, Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden .
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2008 (English)In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation, ISSN 1741-8267, E-ISSN 1741-8275, Vol. 15, no 3, 258-262 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background To evaluate potential sex differences, this study aimed to investigate blood pressure and lipid control and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease in treated hypertensive (tHT) patients from primary healthcare. Design and methods This cross-sectional survey of tHT patients was carried out between 2002 and 2005 by 264 primary care physicians from Sweden who consecutively recruited 6537 tHT patients (48% men and 52% women) from medical records. Results tHT men more often reached the treatment goal for systolic/diastolic blood pressure, less than 140/90 mmHg, than tHT women (30 vs. 26%, P < 0.01). Men had lower systolic blood pressure than women, however, women had lower diastolic blood pressure and higher pulse pressure. More tHT women had total cholesterol >= 5.0 mmol/l than corresponding men (75 vs. 64% P < 0.001). Men more often had diabetes (25 vs. 20% P < 0.001), left ventricular hypertrophy (20 vs. 16% P < 0.001), and microalbuminuria (24 vs. 16% P < 0.001). Women were more often treated with diuretics (64 vs. 48%) and P-receptor blockers, (54 vs. 51%), and men more often treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (27 vs. 18%), calcium channel blockers (34 vs. 26%), and lipid-lowering drugs (34 vs. 29%). Conclusion A need still exists for more intensified treatment of elevated blood pressure and hypercholesterolemia, especially in women. In hypertensives of both sexes, smoking and other risk factors also need to be addressed to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 15, no 3, 258-262 p.
Keyword [en]
cholesterol, hypertension, primary healthcare, risk factors, sex
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-47965DOI: 10.1097/HJR.0b013e3282f37a45OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-47965DiVA: diva2:268861
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13

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Petersson, Ulla

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