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MISiCFET chemical sensors for applications in exhaust gases and flue gases
Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
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2002 (English)In: Materials Science Forum, ISSN 0255-5476, E-ISSN 1662-9752, Vol. 433-4, 953-956 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A chemical gas sensor based on a silicon carbide field effect transistor with a catalytic gate metal has been under development for a number of years. The choice of silicon carbide as the semiconductor material allows the sensor to operate at high temperatures, for more than 6 months in flue gases at 300degreesC and for at least three days at 700degreesC. The chemical inertness of silicon carbide and a buried gate design makes it a suitable sensor technology for applications in corrosive environments such as exhaust gases and flue gases from boilers. The selectivity of the sensor devices is established through the choice of type and structure of the gate metal as well as the operation temperature. In this way NH3 sensors with low cross sensitivity to NOx have been demonstrated as potential sensors for control of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx by urea injection into diesel exhausts. Here we show that sensors with a porous platinum or iridium gate show different temperature ranges for NH3 detection. The hardness of the silicon carbide makes it for example more resistant to water splash at cold start of a petrol engine than existing technologies, and a sensor which can control the air to fuel ratio, before the exhaust gases are heated, has been demonstrated. Silicon carbide sensors are also tested in flue gases from boilers. Efficient regulation of the combustion in a boiler will decrease fuel consumption and reduce emissions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002. Vol. 433-4, 953-956 p.
Keyword [en]
ammonia, catalytic metals, combustion, exhaust gases, field effect transistor, flue gases, gas sensor, high temperature, SCR
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-48564OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-48564DiVA: diva2:269460
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12

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Wingbrant, HelenaUnéus, LarsLöfdahl, MikaelLloyd-Spets, Anita

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Wingbrant, HelenaUnéus, LarsLöfdahl, MikaelLloyd-Spets, Anita
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