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Long-term outcome of long-term psychoanalytically oriented therapies: First findings of the Stockholm outcome of psychotherapy and psychoanalysis study
Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Stockholm Cty Council Inst Psychotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Stockholm Cty Council Inst Psychotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
2001 (English)In: Psychotherapy Research, ISSN 1050-3307, E-ISSN 1468-4381, Vol. 11, no 4, 361-382 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The scarcity of findings on the effectiveness of psychodynamic long-term psychotherapy and psychoanalysis is a problem, at least in countries where these treatments are the general treatment of choice. In this study, a sample of 105 patients in various stages before, during, and after treatment was drawn froth a population of 1,200 patients who had received or were on a waiting list for public subsidized long-term psychoanalytically oriented psychotherapy or psychoanalysis. The average duration was 40 months for the psychotherapies and 51 months for the psychoanalyses. All patients completed a questionnaire, including the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90), Sense of Coherence Scale (SOCS), and Social Adjustment Scale (SAS), on 3 occasions with 12-month intervals. Using a partly within- and between-subjects design, group means were regressed on an ordinal time scale covering 7 stages in the treatment process: before, early during, during, late during, soon after, after, and late after treatment. The slopes indicated small to moderate effect sizes (d = 0.4-0.6) for psychotherapy and moderate to very large effect sizes (d = 0.4-1.5) for psychoanalysis. The largest effect sizes were on the SCL-90 and the lowest on the SAS for both groups. The proportions of patients with more "healthy" scores compared, with the worst scoring 10% in a nonclinical norm group increased from roughly 30% to 55% in the psychotherapy group and from 10% to 75% in the psychoanalysis group. The results underscore the importance of long-terns follow-up when evaluation of long-term treatments is concerned.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2001. Vol. 11, no 4, 361-382 p.
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Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-49003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-49003DiVA: diva2:269899
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12

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Sandell, Rolf

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