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Future thinking in tinnitus patients
Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4753-6745
Kyrre Svalastog, O., Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden, Department of Audiology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
2007 (English)In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 63, no 2, 191-194 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The purpose of the study was to investigate future thinking in a group of tinnitus patients. It was predicted that participants in the tinnitus group would report fewer positive future events. Methods: A cross-sectional design was used. Two groups of participants completed the test session: tinnitus patients (n=20) and healthy controls (n=20) without tinnitus. Participants completed measures of anticipation of future positive and negative experiences, anxiety and depression. In addition, participants with tinnitus completed a test of tinnitus annoyance. Results: Tinnitus participants generated a greater number of negative future events compared to the controls. There was no difference between the groups on positive future events or on self-reported anxiety, but the tinnitus group scored higher on a depression measure. Controlling for depression scores removed the group difference. Conclusions: While the groups differed on future thinking, the difference concerned negative events, which suggests that anxious information processing might be important in explaining tinnitus annoyance. Levels of depressive symptoms should, however, be considered. © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 63, no 2, 191-194 p.
Keyword [en]
Cognition, Depression, Health anxiety, Prospective cognitions, Tinnitus
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-49077DOI: 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2007.02.012OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-49077DiVA: diva2:269973
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12

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Andersson, GerhardSarkohi, Ali

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