liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Body size and food web structure: testing the equiprobability assumption of the cascade model
Woods Hole Oceanog Inst, Dept Biol, Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA Arkansas State Univ, Dept Sci Biol, State Univ, AR 72467 USA CEFAS Lowestoft Lab, Lowestoft NR33 0HT, Suffolk, England Linkoping Univ, Dept Biol, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden US EPA, Ecosyst Assessment Branch, Athens, GA 30605 USA.
Woods Hole Oceanog Inst, Dept Biol, Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA Arkansas State Univ, Dept Sci Biol, State Univ, AR 72467 USA CEFAS Lowestoft Lab, Lowestoft NR33 0HT, Suffolk, England Linkoping Univ, Dept Biol, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden US EPA, Ecosyst Assessment Branch, Athens, GA 30605 USA.
Woods Hole Oceanog Inst, Dept Biol, Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA Arkansas State Univ, Dept Sci Biol, State Univ, AR 72467 USA CEFAS Lowestoft Lab, Lowestoft NR33 0HT, Suffolk, England Linkoping Univ, Dept Biol, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden US EPA, Ecosyst Assessment Branch, Athens, GA 30605 USA.
Show others and affiliations
2000 (English)In: Oecologia, ISSN 0029-8549, E-ISSN 1432-1939, Vol. 123, no 2, 241-251 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The cascade model successfuly predicts many patterns in reported food webs. A key assumption of this model is the existence of a predetermined trophic hierarchy, prey are always lower in the hierarchy than their predators. At least three studies have suggested that, in animal food webs, this hierarchy can be explained to a large extent by body size relationships. A second assumption of the standard cascade model is that trophic links not prohibited by the hierarchy occur with equal probability. Using nonparametric contingency table analyses, we tested this "equiprobability hypothesis" in 16 published animal food webs for which the adult body masses of the species had been estimated. We found that when the hierarchy was based on body size, the equiprobability hypothesis was rejected in favor of an alternative, "predator-dominance" hypothesis wherein the probability of a trophic link varies with the identity of the predator. Another alternative to equiprobabilty is that the probability of a trophic link depends upon the ratio of the body sizes of the two species. Using nonparametric regression and liklihood ratio tests, we show that a size-ratio based model represents a significant improvement over the cascade model. These results suggest that models with heterogeneous predation probabilities will fit food web data better than the homogeneous cascade model. They also suggest a new way to bridge the gap between static and dynamic food web models.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2000. Vol. 123, no 2, 241-251 p.
Keyword [en]
food webs, body size, cascade model, contingency tables, kernel smoothing
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-49720OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-49720DiVA: diva2:270616
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

In the same journal
Oecologia
Natural Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 19 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf