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As time goes by. Long-term outcomes of psychoanalysis and long-term psychotherapy
Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
Linkoping Univ, Dept Educ Psychol, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden Stockholm Cty Council, Inst Psychotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
Linkoping Univ, Dept Educ Psychol, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden Stockholm Cty Council, Inst Psychotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
Linkoping Univ, Dept Educ Psychol, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden Stockholm Cty Council, Inst Psychotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
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1999 (English)In: Forum der Psychoanalyse (Print), ISSN 0178-7667, E-ISSN 1437-0751, Vol. 15, no 4, 327-347 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Generalizations about the outcomes of psychotherapy are essentially based on research on brief therapies with quite short follow-up. The present paper is a survey of some of the findings in an effectiveness study of psychoanalysis and long-term psychotherapy, typically psychoanalytically oriented, in private practice. The design was a three-wave panel comprising more than 700 patients. At the end of the third wave, 418 patients in different phases of treatment remained in the sample. Across a reconstructed time scale covering roughly seven years, before, during, and after treatment, the 74 psychoanalysis cases described a very positive development, whereas the development among the 331 psychotherapy cases was moderately positive. The findings emphasize the importance of extended follow-up. When therapist variables are considered, therapeutic experience had complex or mixed associations with patients outcome. Especially positive were high age and many years, in private practice, after licensing. Therapeutic ideals and attitudes divided the therapist group in three subgroups, one of which was characterized by purely classical psychoanalytic views on the values of support, friendliness etc. Therapists in the classically psychoanalytic cluster were found to do poorly with patients in psychotherapy, in contrast to patients in psychoanalysis. It is concluded that psychoanalysis and psychodynamically oriented psychotherapy are qualitatively different.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1999. Vol. 15, no 4, 327-347 p.
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Social Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-49884OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-49884DiVA: diva2:270780
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12

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Sandell, Rolf

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