liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Lysosomal labilization
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric .
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology .
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology .
2006 (English)In: IUBMB Life - A Journal of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, ISSN 1521-6543, E-ISSN 1521-6551, Vol. 58, no 9, 531-539 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The lysosomal compartment is the place for cellular degradation of endocytosed and autophagocytosed material and a center for normal turnover of organelles as well as most long-lived proteins. Lysosomes were long considered stable structures that broke and released their many hydrolytic enzymes only following necrotic cell death. It is now realized that lysosomes instead are quite vulnerable, although in a heterogeneous way. Their exposure to a number of events, such as oxidative stress, lysosomotropic detergents and aldhydes, as well as overexpression of the p53 protein, causes time-and-dose-dependent lysosomal rupture that is followed by apoptosis or necrosis. Partial lysosomal rupture has often been found to be an early upstream event in apoptosis, while necrosis results from fulminant lysosomal rupture. Consequently, factors influencing the stability of lysosomes, for instance their content of labile and redox-active iron, seem to be essential for the survival of cells. © 2006 IUBMB.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 58, no 9, 531-539 p.
Keyword [en]
Cell death, Lysosomes, Oxidative stress, Redox-active iron
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-50149DOI: 10.1080/15216540600904885OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-50149DiVA: diva2:271045
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Terman, AlexeiKurz, TinoGustafsson, BertilBrunk, Ulf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Terman, AlexeiKurz, TinoGustafsson, BertilBrunk, Ulf
By organisation
Faculty of Health SciencesGeriatric Pharmacology Department of Clinical and Experimental MedicineDepartment of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics
In the same journal
IUBMB Life - A Journal of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 82 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf