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Visual phonemic ambiguity and speechreading
Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
Centre for Speech Technology, KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
2006 (English)In: Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, ISSN 1092-4388, E-ISSN 1558-9102, Vol. 49, no 4, 835-847 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To study the role of visual perception of phonemes in visual perception of sentences and words among normal-hearing individuals. Method: Twenty-four normal-hearing adults identified consonants, words, and sentences, spoken by either a human or a synthetic talker. The synthetic talker was programmed with identical parameters within phoneme groups, hypothetically resulting in simplified articulation. Proportions of correctly identified phonemes per participant, condition, and task, as well as sensitivity to single consonants and clusters of consonants, were measured. Groups of mutually exclusive consonants were used for sensitivity analyses and hierarchical cluster analyses. Results: Consonant identification performance did not differ as a function of talker, nor did average sensitivity to single consonants. The bilabial and labiodental clusters were most readily identified and cohesive for both talkers. Word and sentence identification was better for the human talker than the synthetic talker. The participants were more sensitive to the clusters of the least visible consonants with the human talker than with the synthetic talker. Conclusions: It is suggested that ability to distiguish between clusters of the least visually distinct phonemes is important in speechreading. Specifically, it reduces the number of candidates, and thereby facilitates lexical identification. © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 49, no 4, 835-847 p.
Keyword [en]
Articulation, Normal hearing, Speechreading, Students
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-50163DOI: 10.1044/1092-4388(2006/059)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-50163DiVA: diva2:271059
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12

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Lidestam, Björn

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf