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Non-invasive continuous estimation of blood flow changes in human patellar bone
Näslund, J., Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
Rehabilitation Medicine University Clinic Stockholm, Danderyds Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
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2006 (English)In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, E-ISSN 1741-0444, Vol. 44, no 6, 501-509 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A photoplethysmographic (PPG) technique to assess blood flow in bone tissue has been developed and tested. The signal detected by the PPG consists of a constant-level (DC) component - which is related to the relative vascularization of the tissue - and a pulsatile (AC) component - which is synchronous with the pumping action of the heart. The PPG probe was applied on the skin over the patella. The probe uses near-infrared (804 nm) and green (560 nm) light sources and the AC component of the PPG signals of the two wavelengths was used to monitor pulsatile blood flow in the patellar bone and the overlying skin, respectively. Twenty healthy subjects were studied and arterial occlusion resulted in elimination of PPG signals at both wavelengths, whereas occlusion of skin blood flow by local surface pressure eliminated only the PPG signal at 560 nm. In a parallel study on a physical model with a rigid tube we showed that the AC component of the PPG signal originates from pulsations of blood flow in a rigid structure and not necessarily from volume pulsations. We conclude that pulsatile blood flow in the patellar bone can be assessed with the present PPG technique. © International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering 2006.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 44, no 6, 501-509 p.
Keyword [en]
Bone, Near-infrared light, Perfusion, Photoplethysmography, Pulsatile
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-50206DOI: 10.1007/s11517-006-0070-0OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-50206DiVA: diva2:271102
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12

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Pettersson, JonasLindberg, Lars-Göran

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