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Bone mineral density changes in relation to environmental PCB exposure
Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University, The Medical School, William Leech Building, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH, United Kingdom, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research, Milano, Italy.
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
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2008 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 116, no 9, 1162-1166 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Bone toxicity has been linked to organochlorine exposure following a few notable poisoning incidents, but epidemiologic studies in populations with environmental organochlorine exposure have yielded inconsistent results. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate whether organochlorine exposure was associated with bone mineral density (BMD) in a population 60-81 years of age (154 males, 167 females) living near the Baltic coast, close to a river contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Methods: We measured forearm BMD in participants using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and we assessed low BMD using age- and sex-standardized Z-scores. We analyzed blood samples for five dioxin-like PCBs, the three most abundant non-dioxin-like PCBs, and p,p'-dichlorophenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE). Results: In males, dioxin-like chlorobiphenyl (CB)-118 was negatively associated with BMD, the odds ratio for low BMD (Z-score less than -1) was 1.06 (95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.12) per 10 pg/mL CB-118. The sum of the three most abundant non-dioxin-like PCBs was positively associated with BMD, but not with a decreased risk of low BMD. In females, CB-118 was positively associated with BMD, but this congener did not influence the risk of low BMD in women. Conclusions: Environmental organochlorine exposures experienced by this population sample since the 1930s in Sweden may have been sufficient to result in sex-specific changes in BMD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 116, no 9, 1162-1166 p.
Keyword [en]
Bone mineral density, p, p'-DDE, Polychlorinated biphenyls, Toxic equivalents
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-50376DOI: 10.1289/ehp.11107OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-50376DiVA: diva2:271272
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12

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Hellström, Lennart

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