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Impact of Voice Variation in Speech-Based In-Vehicle Systems on Attitude and Driving Behavior
Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, NLPLAB - Natural Language Processing Laboratory. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems.
Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, NLPLAB - Natural Language Processing Laboratory. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
2009 (English)In: Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Europe Chapter (HFES), 2009Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Automobile manufacturers are making information systems available in all vehicles. Mostsystems are screen based, but increasingly systems are either hybrids (screen/speech) orspeech based. Speech systems in vehicles may have advantages over screen based in-vehiclesystems; literature suggests that speech can be less distracting than screen-based interactions.Nonetheless, using speech systems in the car also introduces social and attitudinal effects.Voices are not neutral! Voices carry socio-economic cues including indicators of gender, age,personality, emotional state, ethniticity, education and social status. Perception ofinformation presented by the voice is influenced by the perception of the voice demographics.This is further complicated by different individuals perceiving voices in different ways. A voicethat is seen as positive by one individual can be perceived negatively by another. We presentresults from a number of driving simulator studies of speech based in-vehicle systems. These studiesshow that speech based in-vehicle systems can affect drivers’ attitude and drivingperformance. Attitude and performance can be improved, but the effect of the voice can also proveharmful for driving behaviour and driving safety. This makes it important to include the voice as adesign parameter of speech-based in-vehicle systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009.
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-51123OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-51123DiVA: diva2:272987
Conference
Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Europe Chapter (HFES)
Available from: 2009-10-19 Created: 2009-10-19 Last updated: 2013-05-31

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Dahlbäck, Nils

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf