liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Early induction of GAD(65)-reactive Th2 response in type 1 diabetic children treated with alum-formulated GAD(65)
Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
Show others and affiliations
2010 (English)In: Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews, ISSN 1520-7552, E-ISSN 1520-7560, Vol. 26, no 7, 559-568 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background We have previously shown that two injections of 20 mu g alum-formulated glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD(65)) (GAD-alum; Diamyd (R)) in children with recent-onset type 1 diabetes lead to preservation of residual insulin secretion. In vitro cytokine production at the 15 months follow-up indicated immunomodulation. In the present study, we took advantage of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, cryopreserved during early follow-ups, to investigate whether the immunomodulatory effect of GAD-alum was apparent earlier after treatment, preceding the changes previously reported at 15 months.<p>Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 70 type 1 diabetic children, randomly assigned GAD-alum (n = 35) or placebo (n = 35), that had been frozen at baseline (n = 27) and after 1 (n = 58), 3 (n = 67) and 9 (n = 66) months, were stimulated in vitro with GAD(65), tyrosine phosphatase-like protein IA-2 peptide, insulin peptide, GAD-alum, alum formulation or phytohaemagglutinin. Interleukin (IL)-5, -6, -10, -12, -13, -17, tumour necrosis factor and interferon-gamma were measured in cell supernatants and serum samples using Luminex. Expression of FOXP3 and transforming growth factor-beta was determined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.</p><p>Results Already 1 month after the first injection, GAD(65)-induced IL-5 and IL-13 together with FOXP3 were enhanced in GAD-alum-treated patients compared to those with placebo. The in vitro response at 3 and 9 months was characterized by a broader range of cytokines in the treated group. Notably, only the T-helper 2-associated cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 together with FOXP3 increased continuously over time.</p><p>Conclusions Treatment with GAD-alum in type 1 diabetic children induced an early T-helper 2 immune enhanced response to GAD(65), followed by a wider spectrum of cytokines at 3 and 9 months. Copyright (C) 2010 John Wiley &amp; Sons, Ltd.</p>

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley and Sons , 2010. Vol. 26, no 7, 559-568 p.
Keyword [en]
GAD65, Immunotherapy, Th1/Th2 Immune Response, Immunomodulation, Cytokines
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-52141DOI: 10.1002/dmrr.1126ISI: 000283399000007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-52141DiVA: diva2:279872
Available from: 2009-12-07 Created: 2009-12-07 Last updated: 2012-05-28
In thesis
1. Immunological profile and aspects of immunotherapy in type 1 diabetes
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Immunological profile and aspects of immunotherapy in type 1 diabetes
2010 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic, autoimmune disease caused by a T cell mediated attack on the insulin producing pancreatic ß-cells. Even though reasonable quality of life can be acquired with modern insulin therapy, prevention of acute and late serious complications is facilitated by preservation of residual insulin secretion. Preventing β-cell destruction is therefore an important goal of T1D therapy. Characterisation of immunological changes in the course of T1D is essential for understanding the underlying pathogenic mechanisms and for evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic intervention.

 

This thesis aimed to study the immune profile in individuals at increased risk of T1D and in patients diagnosed with the disease. In addition, the immunological effects of treatment with the B vitamin, Nicotinamide, and by antigen-specific immunotherapy using GAD65, have been studied in high-risk individuals and in T1D patients, respectively.

We have found that individuals at high risk of T1D had an increased T helper (Th) 1 like immune profile, defined by high secretion of interferon (IFN) -γ. At the time of clinical onset of T1D, the Th1 dominance was diminished. We further demonstrate that children with newly diagnosed T1D had a suppressed Th1 like profile, detected by chemokine and chemokine receptor profile. This was accompanied by an induced population of CCR7+ and CD45RA+ naïve, CD8+cytotoxic T (Tc) cells and a reduced CD45RO+ memory Tc cell pool.

 

It has previously been shown that oral Nicotinamide had no clinical effect in prevention of T1D. However, we found that the treatment was associated with a decreased secretion of IFN-γ. We have previously shown that subcutaneous injections with GAD-alum in T1D children induced a better preservation of endogenous insulin secretion compared with placebo. Here, we demonstrate that the treatment induced an early antigen-specific Th2 and regulatory immune profile. After a few months, and still after more than two years, the recall response to GAD65 was characterised by a broader range of cytokines. GAD-alum treatment also induced a GAD65-specific CD4+CD25highFOXP3+ cell population and reduced the levels of CD4+CD25+ cells.

 

In conclusion, a Th1 like immune profile in pre-diabetic individuals indicates an imbalance of the immune system. At time of clinical onset, and in the period afterwards, reduction of the Th1 associated immune response could be an effect of a suppressed destructive process, selective recruitment of effector T cells to the pancreas or a defective immune regulation. The protective effect of GAD-alum in T1D children seems to be mediated by an early skewing of GAD65-induced responses towards a Th2 phenotype. Further, induction of GAD65-specific T cells with regulatory characteristics might be able to suppress autoreactive responses and inflammation in the pancreas.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2010. 82 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1161
National Category
Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-52139 (URN)978-91-7393-467-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2010-01-14, Berzeliussalen, Hälsouniversitetet, Campus US, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 09:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2010-01-24 Created: 2009-12-07 Last updated: 2010-01-25Bibliographically approved
2. GAD65 An Immunomodulator in Type 1 Diabetes
Open this publication in new window or tab >>GAD65 An Immunomodulator in Type 1 Diabetes
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by a deficiency of insulin as a result of an autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic ² -cells. A possibility to preserve remaining ² -cells in children with newly diagnosed T1D is of great importance since sustained ² -cell function is recognized to result in reduced end-organ complications. Glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) is one of the major antigens targeted by self-reactive T cells in T1D, and immunomodulation with GAD65 formulated in aluminum (GAD-alum) has been considered both in prevention and treatment of T1D. Results from a Phase II trial have shown clinical effect of subcutaneous injections with GAD-alum, this was unfortunately not fully confirmed in the following larger Phase III trial which therefore was closed after 15 months. The general aim of this thesis was to study the immunomodulatory effect of GAD-alum-treatment in children with T1D participating in the Phase II and Phase III trials. We hypothesized that treatment with GAD-alum contributes to the preservation of residual insulin secretion through deviation of the GAD65-specific immune response from a destructive to a protective process, accompanied by a shift from T helper (Th) 1 towards a predominant Th2 profile. In the Phase II trial, GAD-alum-treated patients responded with an early GAD65-specific Th2 skewed cytokine secretion, with highest IL-5 and IL-13 secretion in clinical responders. Also, the CCR4/CCR5 ratio indicating balance between Th2/Tc2 and Th1/Tc1 responses, increased in treated patients. The recall response to GAD65 was characterized by a wide range of cytokines, but the relative contribution of each cytokine suggests a shift towards a more pronounced Th2-associated profile over time. Induction of a CD4+ cell subset upon GAD65-stimulation 4 years after treatment, suggesting clonal expansion of the memory T-cell compartment upon antigen re-challenge, was seen in parallel to a persistent GAD65-specific cytokine response. Finally, even if the phase III trial failed to reach the primary endpoint at 15 months, a subgroup analysis showed that the treatment had an effect on preservation of residual insulin secretion, but the effect was not seen until after 30 months. Taken together, these results suggest that GAD-alum treatment might exert its effect through induction of an early Th2 skewed immune response which tends to deviate away from a destructive Th1/Tc1 response upon GAD65 re-challenge, and generation of GAD65-specific memory T cells that produce cytokines and exert effector responses which may be important for regulating GAD65 immunity. Continued research to better understand how immunomodulation with autoantigen modifies T-cell responses and also which patients are suitable for treatment, is crucial for optimizing future intervention trials using ² -cell antigens.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012. 81 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1310
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-77747 (URN)978-91-7519-888-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-06-01, Berzeliussalen, Hälsouniversitetet, Campus US, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 09:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2012-05-28 Created: 2012-05-28 Last updated: 2012-05-28Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Axelsson, StinaHjorth, MariaÅkerman, LindaLudvigsson, JohnnyCasas, Rosaura

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Axelsson, StinaHjorth, MariaÅkerman, LindaLudvigsson, JohnnyCasas, Rosaura
By organisation
PediatricsFaculty of Health SciencesPediatrics Department of Paediatrics in Linköping
In the same journal
Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 293 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf