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When cognition kicks in: Working memory and speech understanding in noise.
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
2010 (English)In: Noise & Health, ISSN 1463-1741, E-ISSN 1998-4030, Vol. 12, no 49, 263-269 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Perceptual load and cognitive load can be separately manipulated and dissociated in their effects on speech understanding in noise. The Ease of Language Understanding model assumes a theoretical position where perceptual task characteristics interact with the individual's implicit capacities to extract the phonological elements of speech. Phonological precision and speed of lexical access are important determinants for listening in adverse conditions. If there are mismatches between the phonological elements perceived and phonological representations in long-term memory, explicit working memory (WM)-related capacities will be continually invoked to reconstruct and infer the contents of the ongoing discourse. Whether this induces a high cognitive load or not will in turn depend on the individual's storage and processing capacities in WM. Data suggest that modulated noise maskers may serve as triggers for speech maskers and therefore induce a WM, explicit mode of processing. Individuals with high WM capacity benefit more than low WM-capacity individuals from fast amplitude compression at low or negative input speech-to-noise ratios. The general conclusion is that there is an overarching interaction between the focal purpose of processing in the primary listening task and the extent to which a secondary, distracting task taps into these processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nrn Publications , 2010. Vol. 12, no 49, 263-269 p.
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-52198DOI: 10.4103/1463-1741.70505ISI: 000286478600009OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-52198DiVA: diva2:280276
Available from: 2009-12-09 Created: 2009-12-09 Last updated: 2017-12-12

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Rönnberg, JerkerRudner, MaryLunner, TomasZekveld, Adriana

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