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Functional measurements based on feature tracking of cine magnetic resonance images identify left ventricular segments with myocardial scar.
Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
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2009 (English)In: Cardiovascular Ultrasound, ISSN 1476-7120, E-ISSN 1476-7120, Vol. 7, no 53, 1-14 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

The aim of the study was to perform a feature tracking analysis on cine magnetic resonance (MR) images to elucidate if functional measurements of the motion of the left ventricular wall may detect scar defined with gadolinium enhanced MR.

Myocardial contraction can be measured in terms of the velocity, displacement and local deformation (strain) of a particular myocardial segment. Contraction of the myocardial wall will be reduced in the presence of scar and as a consequence of reduced myocardial blood flow.

Methods

Thirty patients (3 women and 27 men) were selected based on the presence or absence of extensive scar in the anteroseptal area of the left ventricle. The patients were investigated in stable clinical condition, 4-8 weeks post ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Seventeen had a scar area >75% in at least one anteroseptal segment (scar) and thirteen had scar area <1% (non-scar). Velocity, displacement and strain were calculated in the longitudinal direction, tangential to the endocardial outline, and in the radial direction, perpendicular to the tangent.

Results

In the scar patients, segments with scar showed lower functional measurements than remote segments. Radial measurements of velocity, displacement and strain performed better in terms of receiver-operator-characteristic curves (ROC) than the corresponding longitudinal measurements. The best area-under-curve was for radial strain, 0.89, where a cut-off value of 38.8% had 80% sensitivity and 86% specificity for the detection of a segment with scar area >50%. As a percentage of the mean, intraobserver variability was 16-14-26% for radial measurements of displacement-velocity-strain and corresponding interobserver variability was 13-12-18%.

Conclusion

Feature tracking analysis of cine-MR displays velocity, displacement and strain in the radial and longitudinal direction and may be used for the detection of transmural scar. The accuracy and repeatability of the radial functional measurements is satisfactory and global measures agree.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 7, no 53, 1-14 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-52269DOI: 10.1186/1476-7120-7-53ISI: 000272351700001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-52269DiVA: diva2:281065
Note

Original Publication: Eva Maret, Tim Tödt, Lars Brudin, Eva Nylander, Eva Swahn, Jan Ohlsson and Jan Engvall, Functional measurements based on feature tracking of cine magnetic resonance images identify left ventricular segments with myocardial scar, 2009, Cardiovascular Ultrasound, (7), 53, 7120. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1476-7120-7-53 Licensee: BioMed Central http://www.biomedcentral.com/

Available from: 2009-12-14 Created: 2009-12-14 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Strategies to improve outcome in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary PCI
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strategies to improve outcome in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary PCI
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) caused by a ruptured atherosclerotic plaque with overlying thrombosis leads to ischemia and progressively to the death of the myocardial cells supplied by the affected coronary artery. Rapid reperfusion with primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) in an experienced centre is the preferred therapy for these patients. The aim of the research program on which this thesis is based was to study the effect of antiplatelet therapy with abciximab on coronary patency  when administered early to an unselected cohort of patients with STEMI intended for primary PCI, to study the impact of health care delay time on infarct size measured with contrast enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (ceMRI), and to evaluate if time delays could be reduced through reorganisation of logistics and personal feedback to staff involved in the care of STEMI patients. Finally measures of wall motion on cine MRI were evaluated to elucidate if functional measurements of the left ventricular wall could detect scar tissue visualised on ceMRI in a post-acute phase of primary PCI.

Material and results: In paper I we report on a study of all consecutive patients who sustained a STEMI in 2005 in the county of Östergötland and who were to be treated with primary PCI. Abciximab given as pretreatment before (n=133) or at the cath-lab after a diagnostic angiography (n=109) was associated with a patent Infarct Related Artery (IRA), i.e. Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) flow 2-3, in 45.9% of patients in the early group versus 20.2% in the cath-lab group, p=0.0001. There were no statistically significant differences in bleeding or mortality rate during the initial hospital stay, nor were there any significant differences between the groups during one-year follow up regarding a Major Adverse Cardiac Event (MACE).

Paper II is based on an examination of 30 patients in a stable clinical condition with ceMRI 4-8 weeks after they had been treated with primary PCI because of STEMI. Patients were selected on the presence of extensive myocardial scar in the anteroseptal segments (n=17) or no scar visible at all in this area or in any other part of the myocardium (n=13). The purpose of the study was to evaluate the ability of a new feature tracking software to measure functional parameters of the heart. The left ventricular wall was divided into 18 segments and myocardial contraction was measured with velocity, displacement and strain in the longitudinal and radial direction. The software calculated a mean value for the 18 segments for each parameter. Receiver-operatorcharacteristics curves (ROC) were constructed. The best area-under-curve (AUC) was for radial strain where a cut-off value of 38.8% had 80% sensitivity and 86% specificity to detect segments with scar>50%.

The impact of health care delay was examined in paper III based on a study in which 89 STEMI patients treated with primary PCI had their infarct size measured with ceMRI in the post-acute phase. Time from First Medical Contact (FMC) to a patent artery correlated weakly with infarct size, r=0.27, p=0.01. However, multivariable analysis showed the LAD as the Infarct Related Artery (IRA), active smoking and occlusion of the IRA at the time of the diagnostic angiogram were correlated with infarct size and that time from FMC to patent artery was not so correlated.

Finally, in the study leading to paper IV, extensive measurements on time delays were performed on 67 consecutive patients with STEMI treated with primary PCI. Through collaboration with different stakeholders in the treatment of STEMI in the catchment area the following types of targeted refining of logistics were done; 1. Ambulance staff prioritise ECG recording, 2. Central evaluation of ECG in all patients with suspected STEMI, and 3. PCI team is ready to accept the patient when two out of three members are on site. Moreover, personal feedback on time delays for each STEMI patient was given to all staff involved in the treatment of the patient. Thereafter, all the time delays for a similar group of consecutive STEMI patients (n=89) were analysed and compared with the delays for the former group. Improvements seen in the post-intervention group were a reduction in time from ECG to cath-lab arrival by 11 minutes, p=0.02 and a non-significant decrease of FMC to a patent artery by six minutes. The main part of this improvement could probably be ascribed to the decision to see to it that an attending cardiologist was present 24/7 and to central evaluation of ECG.

Conclusion: Abciximab given as pre-treatment to patients with STEMI intended for primary PCI was associated with a patent artery in 46% of patients. Moreover, we demonstrated a relationship between health care delay time and infarct size. This delay time could be reduced by a reorganisation of logistics and personal feedback on time delays. Finally, feature tracking analysis of cine MR images could detect segments with extensive myocardial scar in anterior infarction with 80% sensitivity and 86% specificity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012. 78 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1327
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-85808 (URN)978-91-7519-798-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-12-14, Berzeliussalen, Universitetssjukhuset, Campus US, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 13:00 (English)
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Available from: 2012-11-28 Created: 2012-11-28 Last updated: 2014-03-07Bibliographically approved

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