liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Forensic toxicology findings in deaths involving gamma-hydroxybutyrate
National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden.
National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden .
National Board of Forensic Medicine, Linköping, Sweden.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
2010 (English)In: International journal of legal medicine (Print), ISSN 0937-9827, E-ISSN 1437-1596, Vol. 124, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Concentrations of the illicit drug gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) were determined in femoral venous blood and urine obtained at autopsy in a series of GHB-related deaths (N = 49). The analysis of GHB was done by gas chromatography after conversion to gamma-butyrolactone and quantitation of the latter with a flame ionization detector. The cutoff concentration of GHB in femoral blood or urine for reporting positive results was 30 mg/L. The deceased were mainly young men (86%) aged 26.5 +/- 7.2 years (mean +/- SD), and the women (14%) were about 5 years younger at 21.4 +/- 5.0 years. The mean, median, and highest concentrations of GHB in femoral blood (N = 37) were 294, 190, and 2,200 mg/L, respectively. The mean urine-to-blood ratio of GHB was 8.8, and the median was 5.2 (N = 28). In 12 cases, the concentrations of GHB in blood were negative (less than 30 mg/L) when the urine contained 350 mg/L on average (range 31-1,100 mg/L). Considerable poly-drug use was evident in these GHB-related deaths: ethanol (18 cases), amphetamine (12 cases), and various prescription medications (benzodizepines, opiates, and antidepressants) in other cases. Interpreting the concentrations of GHB in postmortem blood is complicated because of concomitant use of other psychoactive substances, variable degree of tolerance to centrally acting drugs, and the lack of reliable information about survival time after use of the drug.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2010. Vol. 124, no 1
Keyword [en]
Autopsy; Toxicology; GHB; Intoxication
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-52875DOI: 10.1007/s00414-008-0299-2OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-52875DiVA: diva2:285781
Available from: 2010-01-13 Created: 2010-01-12 Last updated: 2017-12-12

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Kugelberg, FredrikEklund, ArneJones, Alan Wayne

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Kugelberg, FredrikEklund, ArneJones, Alan Wayne
By organisation
Division of Drug ResearchFaculty of Health Sciences
In the same journal
International journal of legal medicine (Print)
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 85 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf