liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Maternal obesity and morbid obesity: the risk for birth defects in the offspring.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
University of Lund.
2010 (English)In: Birth defects research. Part A, Clinical and molecular teratology, ISSN 1542-0760, Vol. 88, no 1, 35-40 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to assess, in a large data set from Swedish Medical Health Registries, whether maternal obesity and maternal morbid obesity were associated with an increased risk for various structural birth defects. METHODS: The study population consisted of 1,049,582 infants born in Sweden from January 1, 1995, through December 31, 2007, with known maternal weight and height data. Women were grouped in six categories of body mass index (BMI) according to World Health Organization classification. Infants with congenital birth defects were identified from three sources: the Swedish Medical Birth Registry, the Register of Birth Defects, and the National Patient Register. Maternal age, parity, smoking, and year of birth were thought to be potential confounders and were included as covariates in the adjusted odds ratio analyses. RESULTS: Ten percent of the study population was obese. Morbid obesity (BMI > or = 40) occurred in 0.7%. The prevalence of congenital malformations was 4.7%, and the prevalence of relatively severe malformations was 3.2%. Maternal prepregnancy morbid obesity was associated with neural tube defects OR 4.08 (95% CI 1.87-7.75), cardiac defects OR 1.49 (95% CI 1.24-1.80), and orofacial clefts OR 1.90 (95% CI 1.27-2.86). Maternal obesity (BMI > or = 30) significantly increased the risk of hydrocephaly, anal atresia, hypospadias, cystic kidney, pes equinovarus, omphalocele, and diaphragmatic hernia. CONCLUSION: The risk for a morbidly obese pregnant woman to have an infant with a congenital birth defect is small, but for society the association is important in the light of the ongoing obesity epidemic.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 88, no 1, 35-40 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-53094DOI: 10.1002/bdra.20620ISI: 000273944500005PubMedID: 19711433OAI: diva2:286709
Available from: 2010-01-15 Created: 2010-01-15 Last updated: 2010-02-05

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed
By organisation
Obstetrics and gynecology Faculty of Health Sciences
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 43 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link