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Right-hemispheric brain activation correlates to language performance
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3587-3568
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
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2010 (English)In: NEUROIMAGE, ISSN 1053-8119, Vol. 49, no 4, 3481-3488 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Language function in the right-hemispheric homologues of Brocas and Wernickes areas does not only correlate with left-handedness or pathology, but occurs naturally in right-handed healthy subjects as well. In the current study, two non-invasive methods of assessing language lateralization are correlated with behavioral results in order to link hemispheric dominance to language ability in healthy subjects. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) together with a sentence-completion paradigm was used to determine region-specific lateralization indices in the left- and right-sided Brocas and Wernickes areas, the frontal temporal lobe, the anterior cingulate cortex and the parietal lobe. In addition, dichotic listening results were used to determine overall language lateralization and to strengthen conclusions by correlating with fMRI indices. Results showed that fMRI lateralization in the superior parietal, the posterior temporal, and the anterior cingulate cortices correlated to dichotic listening. A decreased right ear advantage (REA), which indicates less left- hemispheric dominance in language, correlated with higher performance in most administered language tasks, including reading, language ability, fluency, and non-word discrimination. Furthermore, right hemispheric involvement in the posterior temporal lobe and the homologue of Brocas area suggests better performance in behavioral language tasks. This strongly indicates a supportive role of the right-hemispheric counterparts of Brocas and Wernickes areas in language performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 49, no 4, 3481-3488 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-53932DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2009.10.041ISI: 000274064500059OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-53932DiVA: diva2:293555
Note
Original Publication: Helene M van Ettinger-Veenstra, Mattias Ragnehed, Mathias Hällgren, Thomas Karlsson, Anne-Marie Landtblom, Peter Lundberg and Maria Engström, Right-hemispheric brain activation correlates to language performance, 2010, NEUROIMAGE, (49), 4, 3481-3488. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2009.10.041 Copyright: Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam http://www.elsevier.com/Available from: 2010-02-12 Created: 2010-02-12 Last updated: 2014-10-02
In thesis
1. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Clinical Diagnosis: Exploring and Improving the Examination Chain
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Clinical Diagnosis: Exploring and Improving the Examination Chain
2009 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is a relatively new imaging technique, first reported in 1992, which enables mapping of brain functions with high spatial resolution. Functionally active areas are distinguished by a small signal increase mediated by changes in local blood oxygenation in response to neural activity. The ability to non-invasively map brain function and the large number of MRI scanners quickly made the method very popular, and fMRI have had a huge impact on the study of brain function, both in healthy and diseased subjects.

The most common clinical application of fMRI is pre-surgical mapping of brain functions in order to optimise surgical interventions. The clinical fMRI examination procedure can be divided into four integrated parts: (1) patient preparation, (2) image acquisition, (3) image analysis and (4) clinical decision. In this thesis, important aspects of all parts of the fMRI examination procedure are explored with the aim to provide recommendations and methods for prosperous clinical usage of the technique.

The most important results of the thesis were: (I) administration of low doses of diazepam to reduce anxiety did not invalidate fMRI mapping results of primary motor and language areas, (II) the choice of visual stimuli equipment can have severe impact on the mapping of visual areas, (III) three-dimensional fMRI imaging sequences did not perform better than two-dimensional imaging sequences, (IV) adaptive spatial filtering can improve the fMRI data analysis, (V) clinical decisions should not be based on activation results from a single statistical threshold.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2009. 73 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1121
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-18095 (URN)978-91-7393-645-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2009-06-02, Majoren, Brigaden Restaurang & Konferens, Brigadgatan 17, 587 58 Linköping, Linköping, 09:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2009-05-06 Created: 2009-05-06 Last updated: 2014-10-02Bibliographically approved
2. Mind your Language, All Right? Performance-dependent neural patterns of language
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mind your Language, All Right? Performance-dependent neural patterns of language
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The main aim of this dissertation was to investigate the difference in neural language patternsrelated to language ability in healthy adults. The focus lies on unraveling the contributions of theright‐hemispheric homologues to Broca’s area in the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and Wernicke’s areain the posterior temporal and inferior parietal lobes. The functions of these regions are far from fullyunderstood at present. Two study populations consisting of healthy adults and a small group ofpeople with generalized epilepsy were investigated. Individual performance scores in tests oflanguage ability were correlated with brain activation obtained with functional magnetic resonanceimaging during semantic and word fluency tasks. Performance‐dependent differences were expectedin the left‐hemispheric Broca’s and Wernicke’s area and in their right‐hemispheric counterparts.

PAPER I revealed a shift in laterality towards right‐hemispheric IFG and posterior temporal lobeactivation, related to high semantic performance. The whole‐brain analysis results of PAPER IIrevealed numerous candidate regions for language ability modulation. PAPER II also confirmed thefinding of PAPER I, by showing several performance‐dependent regions in the right‐hemispheric IFGand the posterior temporal lobe.

In PAPER III, a new study population of healthy adults was tested.Again, the right posterior temporal lobe was related to high semantic performance. A decrease in lefthemisphericIFG activation could be linked to high word fluency ability. In addition, task difficultywas modulated. Increased task complexity showed to correlate positively with bilateral IFGactivation.

Lastly, PAPER IV investigated anti‐correlated regions. These regions are commonly knownas the default mode network (DMN) and are normally suppressed during cognitive tasks. It wasfound that people with generalized epilepsy had an inadequate suppression of regions in the DMN,and showed poorer performance in a complex language test. The results point to neural adaptabilityin the IFG and temporal lobe. Decreased left‐lateralization of the IFG and increased rightlateralizationof the posterior temporal lobe are proposed as characteristics of individuals with highlanguage ability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2013. 56 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1358
Keyword
Language ability, performance, fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging, Broca, Wernicke, temporal lobe, inferior frontal gyrus, reading, fluency, lateralization, lateralisation, right hemisphere, performance-dependent, neural activation
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-91053 (URN)978-91-7519-668-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2013-05-17, Berzeliussalen, Campus US, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2013-04-16 Created: 2013-04-12 Last updated: 2014-10-02Bibliographically approved

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van Ettinger-Veenstra, Helene MRagnehed, MattiasHällgren, MathiasKarlsson, ThomasLandtblom, Anne-MarieLundberg, PeterEngström, Maria

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van Ettinger-Veenstra, Helene MRagnehed, MattiasHällgren, MathiasKarlsson, ThomasLandtblom, Anne-MarieLundberg, PeterEngström, Maria
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RadiologyFaculty of Health SciencesCenter for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIVTechnical AudiologyDepartment of Behavioural Sciences and LearningFaculty of Arts and SciencesNeurologyDepartment of NeurologyDepartment of Medical SpecialistRadiation PhysicsDepartment of Radiation PhysicsDepartment of Radiology in Linköping
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