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The European carbon balance. Part 4: integration of carbon and other trace-gas fluxes
Max Planck Institute.
CEA, CNRS.
CEA, CNRS.
Max Planck Institute.
Show others and affiliations
2010 (English)In: GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY, ISSN 1354-1013, Vol. 16, no 5, 1451-1469 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Overviewing the European carbon (C), greenhouse gas (GHG), and non-GHG fluxes, gross primary productivity (GPP) is about 9.3 Pg yr-1, and fossil fuel imports are 1.6 Pg yr-1. GPP is about 1.25% of solar radiation, containing about 360 x 1018 J energy - five times the energy content of annual fossil fuel use. Net primary production (NPP) is 50%, terrestrial net biome productivity, NBP, 3%, and the net GHG balance, NGB, 0.3% of GPP. Human harvest uses 20% of NPP or 10% of GPP, or alternatively 1 parts per thousand of solar radiation after accounting for the inherent cost of agriculture and forestry, for production of pesticides and fertilizer, the return of organic fertilizer, and for the C equivalent cost of GHG emissions. C equivalents are defined on a global warming potential with a 100-year time horizon. The equivalent of about 2.4% of the mineral fertilizer input is emitted as N2O. Agricultural emissions to the atmosphere are about 40% of total methane, 60% of total NO-N, 70% of total N2O-N, and 95% of total NH3-N emissions of Europe. European soils are a net C sink (114 Tg yr-1), but considering the emissions of GHGs, soils are a source of about 26 Tg CO2 C-equivalent yr-1. Forest, grassland and sediment C sinks are offset by GHG emissions from croplands, peatlands and inland waters. Non-GHGs (NH3, NOx) interact significantly with the GHG and the C cycle through ammonium nitrate aerosols and dry deposition. Wet deposition of nitrogen (N) supports about 50% of forest timber growth. Land use change is regionally important. The absolute flux values total about 50 Tg C yr-1. Nevertheless, for the European trace-gas balance, land-use intensity is more important than land-use change. This study shows that emissions of GHGs and non-GHGs significantly distort the C cycle and eliminate apparent C sinks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing Ltd , 2010. Vol. 16, no 5, 1451-1469 p.
Keyword [en]
agriculture, carbon cycle, CH4, CO2, Europe, forestry, greenhouse gases, land-use change, N2O, NH3, non-greenhouse gases, NOx, O-3
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-55539DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2486.2010.02215.xISI: 000276696100004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-55539DiVA: diva2:316271
Available from: 2010-04-30 Created: 2010-04-30 Last updated: 2013-03-11Bibliographically approved

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Bastviken, David

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Department of Water and Environmental StudiesFaculty of Arts and Sciences
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