liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Computed Tomography: Physical principles and biohazards
Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radio Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3352-8330
1995 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In planar projected images of the patient, important details may be hidden by over-laying tissues. By using slice-imaging techniques (tomography), selective demonstration of morphologic properties, layer by layer, may be performed.

Computerised tomography, CT, is an ideal form of tomography yielding sequence images of thin consecutive slices of the patient and providing the opportunity to localise in three dimensions. Unlike conventional, classical tomography, computerised tomography does not suffer from interference from structures in the patient outside the slice being imaged. This is achieved by irradiating only thin slices of the patient with a fan-shaped beam. Transaxial images (tomograms) of the patient’s anatomy can give more selective information than conventional planar projection radiographs. Compared to planar radiography, CT images have superior contrast resolution, i.e., they are capable of distinguishing very small differences in tissue-attenuation (contrasts), but have inferior spatial resolution. An attenuation difference of 0.4% can be visualised but the smallest details in the image that can be resolved must be separated at least 0.5 mm. In conventional planar radiography, the lowest detectable contrast is larger but details of smaller size can be separated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press , 1995. , 17 p.
Series
Report / Department of Radiology, Linköping University, 1990-1997, ISSN 1102-1799 ; 81
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-57803ISRN: LIU-RAD-R--81OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-57803DiVA: diva2:327804
Available from: 2010-06-30 Created: 2010-06-30 Last updated: 2013-09-03Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

Computed Tomography : Physical principles and biohazards(569 kB)9022 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 569 kBChecksum SHA-512
9e1db394cf1b415f3b5b13e7b1f6158de97422e05b42f75a31d442117059b2f603fcb9e13815702b9532721b5bdfb6d60422d642a0c7d139de040b44d8e1b4be
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Authority records BETA

Sandborg, Michael

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Sandborg, Michael
By organisation
Radio PhysicsFaculty of Health SciencesDepartment of Radiation Physics
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 9022 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 223 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf