liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Is Sweden still a role model for safety? An overview of unintentional injury data over the past two decades
Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Karolinska Institute.
Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency MSB.
Show others and affiliations
2010 (English)In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF INJURY CONTROL AND SAFETY PROMOTION, ISSN 1745-7300, Vol. 17, no 3, 195-203 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates injury-related mortality and hospitalisations, during 1987-2007 in Sweden. Injuries were classified according to International Classification of Diseases (ICD) -8 for pre-1987 injuries, ICD-9 for 1987-1996 injuries and ICD-10 for injuries occurring in 1997 and later. Data on mortality from injuries during 1987-2007 were collected from Swedens national Cause-of-Death Register, while data concerning injury diagnoses leading to hospitalisation stays of at least 24h, occurring during 1987-2007, were obtained from the national Patient Register. Crude rates were derived for injury-related deaths and injury-related hospitalisations for age-gender groups, using population data from Statistics Sweden. Our results showed a mixed picture of injury-related hospitalisations and deaths over the study period. Absolute numbers of injury-related deaths and injury-related hospitalisations decreased over time for the population as a whole and for many, but not all, age-gender groups. When assessing crude injury-related death rates and crude injury-related hospitalisation rates over time, as categorised by gender and age groupings, we also found unchanging or increased risks for injury-related deaths and/or hospitalisations for several age-gender groups. While Sweden has made remarkable progress in reducing injury-related deaths and hospitalisations, there are clear differences in risk that remain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor and Francis , 2010. Vol. 17, no 3, 195-203 p.
Keyword [en]
injury, injury control, injury prevention
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-58648DOI: 10.1080/17457301003728502ISI: 000280637600008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-58648DiVA: diva2:344885
Available from: 2010-08-22 Created: 2010-08-20 Last updated: 2010-08-22

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Nilsen, Per

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Nilsen, Per
By organisation
Department of Medicine and Health SciencesFaculty of Health SciencesDivision of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 272 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf