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Density-dependent dispersal and relative dispersal affect the stability of predator-prey metacommunities
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
Laboratoire Université Pierre et Marie Curie, France.
Laboratoire Bioemco, Ecole Normale Supérieure, France.
Department of Biology, McGill University, Canada.
2010 (English)In: Journal of Theoretical Biology, ISSN 0022-5193, E-ISSN 1095-8541, Vol. 266, no 3, 458-469 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although density-dependent dispersal and relative dispersal (the difference in dispersal rates between species) have been documented in natural systems, their effects on the stability of metacommunities are poorly understood. Here we investigate the effects of intra- and interspecific density-dependent dispersal on the regional stability in a predator-prey metacommunity model. We show that, when the dynamics of the populations reach equilibrium, the stability of the metacommunity is not affected by density-dependent dispersal. However, the regional stability, measured as the regional variability or the persistence, can be modified by density-dependent dispersal when local populations fluctuate over time. Moreover these effects depend on the relative dispersal of the predator and the prey. Regional stability is modified through changes in spatial synchrony. Interspecific density-dependent dispersal always desynchronizses local dynamics, whereas intraspecific density-dependent dispersal may either synchronize or desynchronize it depending on dispersal rates. Moreover, intra- and interspecific density-dependent dispersal strengthen the top-down control of the prey by the predator at intermediate dispersal rates. As a consequence the regional stability of the metacommunity is increased at intermediate dispersal rates. Our results show that density-dependent dispersal and relative dispersal of species are keys to understanding the response of ecosystems to fragmentation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 266, no 3, 458-469 p.
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-58820DOI: 10.1016/j.jtbi.2010.07.008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-58820DiVA: diva2:345888
Available from: 2010-08-27 Created: 2010-08-27 Last updated: 2017-12-12

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Hauzy, Céline

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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