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Game Theory in Signal Processing and Communications
Technical University of Dresden, Germany .
University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
University of Houston, USA.
Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Communication Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7599-4367
2009 (English)In: EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing, ISSN 1687-6172, E-ISSN 1687-6180, article id 128184Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Game theory is a branch of mathematics aimed at the modeling and understanding of resource conflict problems. Essentially, the theory splits into two branches: noncooperative and cooperative game theory. The distinction between the two is whether or not the players in the game can make joint decisions regarding the choice of strategy. Noncooperative game theory is closely connected to minimax optimization and typically results in the study of various equilibria, most notably the Nash equilibrium. Cooperative game theory examines how strictly rational (selfish) actors can benefit from voluntary cooperation by reaching bargaining agreements. Another distinction is between static and dynamic game theory, where the latter can be viewed as a combination of game theory and optimal control. In general, the theory provides a structured approach to many important problems arising in signal processing and communications, notably resource allocation and robust transceiver optimization. Recent applications also occur in other emerging fields, such as cognitive radio, spectrum sharing, and in multihop-sensor and adhoc networks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. article id 128184
Keywords [en]
Game theory; Special issues and sections
National Category
Communication Systems
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-58917DOI: 10.1155/2009/128184Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-73449119558OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-58917DiVA, id: diva2:346485
Available from: 2010-09-01 Created: 2010-09-01 Last updated: 2018-07-05

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Larsson, Erik G.

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
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  • vancouver
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More styles
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  • en-US
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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