liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Demographic Colonialism: EU-African Migration Management and the Legacy of Eurafrica
Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0497-473X
Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2007-3736
2011 (English)In: Globalizations, ISSN 1474-7731, E-ISSN 1474-774X, Vol. 8, no 3, 261-276 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article we analyse the current trajectory of EU-African migration policy. Unlike many other scholars, we suggest it must be understood in its historical context. Migration between Europe and Africa has been a European concern at least since the 1920s. At that time, issues of migration were seen in the context of a co-European colonial effort in Africa. Today, migration issues are to be resolved in the framework of a EU-African partnership model built on equality, interdependence and mutual ‘win-win’ dynamics. However, a closer look at the history of Euro-African migration reveals striking parallels between past and present. Throughout the period from the 1920s and onward, the migration policies devised within various frameworks of European integration have been shaped by demographic projections. Presumed demographic ‘imbalances’ (i.e. population surplus or deficit) have been used to justify vastly different migrant regimes. Each time demography has governed European migration policy vis-à-vis Africa, what has first been introduced as a mutual interest has quickly been transformed into a geopolitical relationship, where one partner has channelled migration to its own benefit. We argue that as long as scholars and intellectuals persist in imitating policy-makers’ disregard of European integration’s colonial history, current structural power asymmetries between the EU and Africa will not only remain obscure; we will also fail to recognize the continued, or even increasing, currency of colonial ideology in the EU’s African relations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London och New York: Routledge , 2011. Vol. 8, no 3, 261-276 p.
National Category
History Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-59245DOI: 10.1080/14747731.2011.576842ISI: 000299820600002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-59245DiVA: diva2:350251
Available from: 2010-09-10 Created: 2010-09-10 Last updated: 2017-12-12

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(535 kB)938 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 535 kBChecksum SHA-512
82200e2367a5062cfd99ba0dadbd2a057db42b3ecbf435e1f99e03879d7f7eb0ffcc656704eb1b9a5330b6fa23738532cf6e1eff47e67812250c1b9c806af9de
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Hansen, PeoJonsson, Stefan

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hansen, PeoJonsson, Stefan
By organisation
REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and SocietyDepartment of Social and Welfare StudiesFaculty of Arts and Sciences
In the same journal
Globalizations
HistoryOther Social Sciences not elsewhere specified

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 938 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 520 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf