liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The use of information and communication technology (ICT) outside of school for boys and girls with motor disabilities. In Assistive technology from adapted equipment to inclusive environments: In Assistive technology from adapted equipment to inclusive environments
Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Uppsala.
Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
2009 (English)In: Assistive technology research series, ISSN 1383-813X, Vol. 25, 595-599 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to investigate boys and girls with motor disabilities use and opinions of Information Communication Technology (ICT) in outside-of-school activities compared with non-disabled children. Participants were 254 children and youths, with motor disabilities, attending mainstream schools. The participants responded to a questionnaire about the use of ICT activities outside-of-school. For group comparisons with non-disabled children, data from the survey “Kids and Media” was used. A significantly higher proportion of children with motor disabilities was engaged in ICT activities, such as using the Internet, playing computer games and visiting communities. Our study reveals a positive result from a gender perspective, where the use of ICT activities is more equal among boys and girls with disabilities than among non-disabled boys and girls. This brings new interest in ICT and computer activities as an opportunity for all boys and girls, since previous studies show that digital skills affect academic skills, and ICT activities may also serve as a gateway to technology in general.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 25, 595-599 p.
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-59662DOI: 10.3233/978-1-60750-042-1-595OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-59662DiVA: diva2:352975
Available from: 2010-09-23 Created: 2010-09-23 Last updated: 2010-09-24

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Hemmingsson, Helena

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hemmingsson, Helena
Occupational Therapy

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 114 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf