liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Surveying improvement activities in health care on a national level--the swedish internal collaborative strategy and its challenges
Swedish Federation of County Councils, Stockholm.
Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
2003 (English)In: Quality Management in Health Care, ISSN 1063-8628, E-ISSN 1550-5154, Vol. 12, no 4, 202-216 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In order to map improvement activities in Swedish health care, we surveyed the managers of all primary health care centers (n = 958) and clinical hospital departments (n = 1355), with a response rate of 46%. The majority reports that their staff view improvement work positively. The most common driver of improvement is work environment problems, whereas external drivers have less influence. Among 35 methods, the most commonly used are educational initiatives, stress management, guidelines, and leadership development, whereas accreditation is used the least. Respondents who report extensive improvement efforts indicate the greatest benefit from educational interventions, analysis of patient incidents, guidelines, and rapid cycle tests. Respondents claim that improvement initiatives yield positive results, in particular regarding the working environment, administrative routines, workflow, and communication, although only 15%-30% of respondents report having data to support their claims. Our findings indicate an introverted focus of most improvement efforts, starting with staff and administration needs. Further research is needed to understand how and why some centers and departments have managed to achieve strategic, measurable, patient-focused, systems improvements, whereas most have not.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. Vol. 12, no 4, 202-216 p.
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-60042PubMedID: 14603782OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-60042DiVA: diva2:354783
Available from: 2010-10-04 Created: 2010-10-04 Last updated: 2017-12-12

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

PubMedLink to article

Authority records BETA

Kammerlind, PeterElg, Mattias

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Kammerlind, PeterElg, Mattias
By organisation
Quality Technology and ManagementThe Institute of Technology
In the same journal
Quality Management in Health Care
Social Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 103 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf