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An obesity provoking behaviour negatively influences young normal weight subjects' Health Related Quality of Life and causes depressive symptoms
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1680-1000
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2010 (English)In: Eating Behaviors, ISSN 1471-0153, E-ISSN 1873-7358, Vol. 11, no 4, 247-252 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In many parts of the world the prevalence of a sedentary lifestyle in combination with high consumption of food has increased, which contributes to increased risk for becoming overweight. Our primary aim was, in an intervention, to examine the influence on health related quality of life (HRQoL) and mood in young normal weight subjects of both sexes, when adopting an obesity provoking behaviour by increasing the energy intake via fast food and simultaneously adopting a sedentary lifestyle. A secondary aim was to follow-up possible long-term effects on HRQoL and mood 6 and 12 months after this short-term intervention.

In this prospective study, 18 healthy normal weight subjects (mean age 26 ± 6.6 years), mainly university students were prescribed doubled energy intake, and maximum 5000 steps/day, during 4 weeks. An age and sex matched control group (n = 18), who were asked to have unchanged eating habits and physical activity, was recruited. Before and after the intervention questionnaires including Short Form-36, Hospital Anxiety Depression scale, Center of Epidemiological Studies Depression scale, Sense of Coherence and Mastery scale were completed by the subjects in the intervention group and by the controls with 4 weeks interval. Six and 12 months after the intervention the subjects underwent the same procedure as at baseline and the controls completed the same questionnaires.

During the intervention, subjects in the intervention group increased their bodyweight and developed markedly lower physical and mental health scores on Short Form-36 as well as depressive symptoms while no changes appeared in the controls. The increase of depressive symptoms was associated with increases of energy intake, body weight and body fat. When followed up, 6 and 12 months after the intervention, physical and mental health had returned completely to baseline values, despite somewhat increased body weight.

In conclusion, adopting obesity provoking behaviour for 4 weeks decreases HRQoL and mood in young normal weight subjects. The effect is temporary and when followed up 6 and 12 months after the short-term intervention no remaining influence is found.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2010. Vol. 11, no 4, 247-252 p.
Keyword [en]
Depressive symptoms; Feeding behaviour; Lifestyle; Health related quality of life; Weight gain
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-60149DOI: 10.1016/j.eatbeh.2010.05.005ISI: 000283484700007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-60149DiVA: diva2:355347
Available from: 2010-10-06 Created: 2010-10-06 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Hyper-alimentation - effects on health and well-being.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hyper-alimentation - effects on health and well-being.
2010 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The general aim of this thesis was to prospectively examine the effects on health and well-being when healthy normal weight individuals increase their energy intake, mainly from fast food and simultaneously adopt a sedentary lifestyle.

This thesis is based upon a prospective experimental study design where 18 healthy normal weight individuals, 12 men and 6 women, aged 26 (6.6) years, increased their energy intake with in average 70 % during four weeks. Simultaneously their physical activity was limited to a maximum of 5000 steps per day. An age and gender matched control group (n=18), was recruited and asked not to change their eatingand physical activity habits for four weeks. Long-term follow-up measurements were performed after 6 and 12 months and 2.5 years after the intervention.

During the intervention body weight increased with 6.4 (2.8) kg and measurements of body composition showed an increase of both fat mass and fat free mass after the intervention. Lower physical and mental health scores on SF-36 as well as depressive symptoms were found compared to baseline. They were temporary and when followed up 6 and 12 months after the intervention, physical and mental health had returned to baseline values, despite a somewhat increased body weight. The main essence of adopting an obesity provoking behaviour was lack of energy emerging from five structures: influenced self-confidence, commitment to oneself and others, managing eating, feelings of tiredness and physical impact. Laboratory measurements showed an increase of ALT above reference limits in 14 of the 18 participants during the intervention and HTGC increased, although this was not related to the increase in ALT levels. Twelve months after the intervention an increase of body weight with 1.5 (2.4) kg was found compared to baseline (p=0.018), fat free mass was unchanged compared to baseline while fat mass had increased, + 1.4 (1.9) kg (p=0.01). Two and a half years after the intervention an increase of body weight with 3.1 (4.0) kg was found compared to baseline (p=0.01), while there was no change in controls compared to baseline, + 0.1 (2.5) kg (p=0.88).

Hyper-alimentation and limited physical activity during a short-term period of 4 weeks is sufficient to temporarily induce worsened HRQoL, cause depressive symptoms and lack of energy in healthy normal weight individuals. There were also temporary but clear effects on biochemical markers, suggesting that hyperalimentation per se can induce profound ALT elevations in less than 4 weeks. During the intervention both fat mass and fat-free mass increased while after 12 months there was only an increase of fat mass which was greater than expected from epidemiological studies. The marked difference between the increase in body weight in the intervention- and control group at 2.5 years also raises the question whether there is a long-term effect of increasing fat mass after a short period of hyperalimentation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2010. 86 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1200
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-60171 (URN)978-91-7393-331-5 (ISBN)
Public defence
2010-10-01, Berzeliussalen, Hälsouniversitetet,, Campus US, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 09:00 (Swedish)
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Available from: 2010-10-11 Created: 2010-10-07 Last updated: 2010-10-11Bibliographically approved

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Ernersson, ÅsaHollman Frisman, GunillaSepa Frostell, AnneliNyström, FredrikLindström, Torbjörn

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Ernersson, ÅsaHollman Frisman, GunillaSepa Frostell, AnneliNyström, FredrikLindström, Torbjörn
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Nursing ScienceFaculty of Health SciencesPediatricsCardiologyDepartment of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL
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