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Emotional support predicts more sickness absence and poorer self assessed work ability: a two-year prospective cohort study
Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0279-5903
Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
2010 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 10, no 1, 648- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: While back pain and stressful work environment are shown to be important causes of sickness absence the effect of psychosocial resources on sickness absence, and on self assessed work ability, is less commonly investigated. The aim of this study was to assess these associations in a two-year follow-up study.

METHODS: 341 working people aged 45 to 64, randomly drawn from the population, responded to a questionnaire at baseline and at a two-year follow-up. Poisson regression was used to analyse the association of psychosocial factors (psychosocial instruments on work environment, emotional support and psychological resources) and previous back pain (low back and/or neck) at baseline with sickness absence (spells and days) at follow-up, controlling for effects of age, sex, BMI, smoking, alcohol, occupation, disease and previous sickness absence. Logistic regression was used to study the associations of psychosocial factors and previous back pain at baseline with self assessed prognosis of poor work ability six months from follow-up. Finally, a multivariate analysis tested the independent effects of previous back pain and 3 psychosocial factors derived in a factor analysis: 1. work environment; 2. emotional support; 3. psychological resources, on work ability and absence days and spells.

RESULTS: 80% of the sickness absence spells within the last 12 months before follow-up were short-term (<= 14 days). In the final model, high emotional support predicted more sickness absence spells (RR 1.36; 1.11-1.67) and days (RR 1.68, 1.22-2.31). Previous back pain (OR 2.56; 1.13-5.81), high emotional support (OR 1.58; 1.02-2.46), and low psychological resources (OR 0.62; 0.44-0.89) were related to poorer self assessed prognosis of work ability at follow up.

CONCLUSIONS: In a general middle aged working population high emotional support was related to more sickness absence and also poorer self assessed prognosis of work ability. Our findings suggest that both sickness absence and self assessed work ability are dependent of life outside work and can be affected by a person's close community.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 10, no 1, 648- p.
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-61458DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-10-648ISI: 000284330000001PubMedID: 20977767OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-61458DiVA: diva2:370365
Note
Original Publication: Nadine Karlsson, Elisabeth Skargren and Margareta Kristenson, Emotional support predicts more sickness absence and poorer self assessed work ability: a two-year prospective cohort study, 2010, BMC Public Health, (10), 1, 648. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-10-648 Copyright: BioMed Central http://www.biomedcentral.com/ Available from: 2010-11-16 Created: 2010-11-16 Last updated: 2017-12-12

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