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Heart failure clinics in the Netherlands in 2003
University Hospital Groningen, The Netherlands.
Franciscus Hospital Roosendaal, The Netherlands.
Franciscus Hospital Roosendaal, The Netherlands.
University Hospital Groningen, The Netherlands.
2004 (English)In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 3, no 4, 271-4 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: Heart failure (HF) care in the Netherlands is going through a lot of changes. Nurses have increasingly important roles in providing optimal care for these chronically ill patients. In this study, we describe the current number of HF management programs and the role of the nurses in these programs. METHOD: Data were collected by a national survey as part of a European HF clinic survey of the UNITE study group of the Working Group on Cardiovascular Nursing between February and March 2003 to 142 hospitals in the Netherlands. RESULTS: In 60% of the hospital locations, there is a HF management program. Most of the programs are organized as HF outpatient clinics. In all HF programs, cardiologists and nurses are involved. Other health care providers involved are, amongst others, general practitioners (29%), dieticians (59%), physical therapists (47%), social workers (30%) and psychologists (17%). All programs offer follow-up after discharge from the hospitals and in most of the programs patients have increased access to a health care provider. Behavioural interventions (68%), psychosocial counselling (64%), patient education (88%) and support of the informal caregivers (59%) are important components. In 90% of the programs (restricted), physical examination is the responsibility of the HF nurse and in 65% of the programs nurses are involved in optimizing medical treatment. Financial support and education of HF nurses is still unstructured and diverse. CONCLUSION: There is a rise in the number of HF programs in the Netherlands. There is diversity in content and intensity of these programs and the role of the nurse is not clearly defined yet. Research and discussion on the subject of optimal effective HF care and the role of the HF nurse is still needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2004. Vol. 3, no 4, 271-4 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-62491DOI: 10.1016/j.ejcnurse.2004.10.002PubMedID: 15572014OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-62491DiVA: diva2:373296
Available from: 2010-11-30 Created: 2010-11-30 Last updated: 2017-12-12

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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