liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Quality of life in older patients with systolic and diastolic heart failure
University of Maastricht .
University of Maastricht .
University of Maastricht .
University of California, Los Angeles.
Show others and affiliations
1999 (English)In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 1, no 2, 151-160 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS: To get insight into the quality of life of a clinical practice sample of patients with heart failure that are admitted to the hospital. Secondly to determine differences between patients with systolic and diastolic dysfunction and finally to describe factors relating to quality of life. METHODS: Three dimensions of quality of life (functional capabilities, symptoms and psychosocial adjustment to illness) were assessed during interviews of 186 patients with chronic heart failure. In addition, data on demographic, clinical and self-care characteristics were collected and patients completed a 6-min walk. RESULTS: On average patients walked 172 m in 6 min and reported functioning in daily life at a mean level of 4.5 MET. Patients experienced four different symptoms of heart failure. Most of them described dyspnea, fatigue, sleep disturbance and ankle oedema. Problems with psychosocial adaptation occurred mostly in social and vocational domains. Overall well-being of patients was rated as 6.4 on a 10-point scale. In regard to quality of life, the only differences between patients with systolic and diastolic heart failure was the occurrence of ankle oedema and health-care orientation. The variance in components of quality of life were partly explained by demographics and clinical characteristics. All three dimensions of quality of life were related to ability for self-care. CONCLUSION: Patients with heart failure seen in clinical practice are often not comparable to patients described in major clinical trials or patients that are admitted for transplant evaluation. Their functional capabilities are more compromised, but they may have fewer problems with psychosocial adjustment. Patients with normal systolic dysfunction also report a low quality of life. It could be important to enhance self-care abilities of patients to improve psychosocial adaptation to illness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1999. Vol. 1, no 2, 151-160 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-62514DOI: 10.1016/S1388-9842(99)00007-0PubMedID: 10937925OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-62514DiVA: diva2:373317
Available from: 2010-11-30 Created: 2010-11-30 Last updated: 2017-12-12

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records BETA

Jaarsma, Tiny

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Jaarsma, Tiny
In the same journal
European Journal of Heart Failure
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 224 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf