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Acoustic and physiologic aspects of bone conduction hearing
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3350-8997
2011 (English)In: Implantable Bone Conduction Hearing Aids / [ed] Kompis M, Karger , 2011, Vol. 71, 10-21 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Bone conduction (BC) is the way sound energy is transmitted by the skull bones to the cochlea causing a sound perception. Even if the BC sound transmission involves several pathways including sound pressure induced in the ear canal, inertial forces acting on the middle ear ossicles and cochlear fluids, alteration of the cochlear space, and pressure transmission through the 3rd window of the cochlea, the BC sound ultimately produces a wave motion on the basilar membrane similar to that of air-conducted sound. The efficiency of the BC stimulation is largely dependent on the skull bone where the skull acts as a rigid body at low frequencies and incorporates different types of wave transmission at higher frequencies. The interaural stimulation difference is determined by the difference between contralateral and ipsilateral BC sound transmission: the transcranial BC sound transmission. To benefit from binaural processing, the transcranial transmission should be low, while the same should be high when using BC hearing aids for unilateral deaf subjects. By appropriately positioning the stimulation, high or low transcranial transmission can be achieved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karger , 2011. Vol. 71, 10-21 p.
Series
Advances in Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, ISSN 0065-3071, E-ISSN 1662-2847 ; 71
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-64501DOI: 10.1159/000323574ISBN: 978-3-8055-9699-2 (print)ISBN: 978-3-8055-9700-5 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-64501DiVA: diva2:392261
Note

Original Publication: Stefan Stenfelt , Acoustic and physiologic aspects of bone conduction hearing, 2011, Advances in Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, (71), 10-21. http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000323574 Copyright: S. Karger AG http://www.karger.com/

Available from: 2011-01-26 Created: 2011-01-26 Last updated: 2017-01-19

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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