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A gas-phase biosensor for environmental monitoring of formic acid: laboratory and field validation
Natl Institute Working Life, SE-90713 Umea, Sweden; Cranfield University, Cranfield Biotechnol Centre, Silsoe MK45 4DT, Beds, England; .
Natl Institute Working Life, SE-90713 Umea, Sweden; Cranfield University, Cranfield Biotechnol Centre, Silsoe MK45 4DT, Beds, England; .
Natl Institute Working Life, SE-90713 Umea, Sweden; Cranfield University, Cranfield Biotechnol Centre, Silsoe MK45 4DT, Beds, England; .
Cranfield University, UK.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1815-9699
2003 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Monitoring, ISSN 1464-0325, E-ISSN 1464-0333, Vol. 5, no 3, 477-482 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In order to encourage more exposure measurements to be performed, a formic acid gas-phase biosensor has been developed for this purpose. In the present paper, an enzyme based biosensor has been validated with respect to analyte selectivity and on-site use. To ensure that the sampler developed measures the compound of interest the biosensor was exposed to three near structural homologues to formic acid, i.e. acetic acid, methanol and formaldehyde. These vapours were generated with and without formic acid and the only compound that was found to have an effect on the performance of the biosensor, albeit a small one, was acetic acid. The field test was performed in a factory using formic acid-containing glue for glulam products. In parallel to the measurements with the biosensor a well defined reference method was used for sampling and analysing formic acid. It was found that the biosensor worked satisfactorily in this environment when used in a stationary position. It was also shown that the biosensor could determine formic acid vapour concentrations down to 0.03 mg m(-3).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry , 2003. Vol. 5, no 3, 477-482 p.
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-65202DOI: 10.1039/b209049jISI: 000183091600020OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-65202DiVA: diva2:395032
Available from: 2011-02-04 Created: 2011-02-04 Last updated: 2017-12-11

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