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Risk of malignancies in relation to terrestrial gamma radiation in a Swedish population cohort
University of Gothenburg.
University of Gothenburg.
County Council Kalmar.
Norwegian University Life Science.
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2011 (English)In: SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, ISSN 0048-9697, Vol. 409, no 3, 471-477 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Results of epidemiological studies on terrestrial gamma radiation (TGR) and related malignancies have not been consistent. This study is a thorough examination of this relationship. Records on all individuals living in two Swedish counties in 1973, along with their annual dwelling coordinates during the 28-year follow-up period, were retrieved from the National Archives and Statistics Sweden. We used Geographical Information System (GIS) to match the individuals dwelling coordinates annually to the TGR given in 200 x 200 m grids produced by the Geological Survey of Sweden. Cases of malignancies and deaths were retrieved from the Swedish Cancer Register. During the follow-up period 61,503 incident cases were included in the analyses and in total 11 million person-years were recorded. Cox regression was used both in a linear continuous model and analyses of six exposure categories. Adjustments were made for sex, age, and population density. The hazard ratio (HR) per 100 nanoGray/hour (nGy/h) was significantly increased for total malignancies and for several sites: however, contrary to expectations, an obvious and anticipated linear exposure-response relationship could not be identified. With the lowest exposure category (0-60 nGy/h) as reference, a statistically significantly increased HR for total malignancies was seen in all exposure categories, except in the highest category 96-366 nGy/h. For breast cancer, thyroid cancer and leukaemia an obvious exposure-response could not be seen.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. , 2011. Vol. 409, no 3, 471-477 p.
Keyword [en]
Environment, Epidemiology, GIS, Ionizing radiation, Potassium, Thorium, Uranium
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-65711DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2010.10.052ISI: 000286291600005OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-65711DiVA: diva2:398521
Available from: 2011-02-18 Created: 2011-02-18 Last updated: 2011-02-18

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Fredrikson, Mats

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf