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Health-related quality of life in patients with cryptogenic polyneuropathy compared with the general population
Ryhov County Hospital.
University of Gothenburg.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
2011 (English)In: DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION, ISSN 0963-8288, Vol. 33, no 7, 617-623 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose. To evaluate the quality of life (QOL) in patients with cryptogenic polyneuropathy. Method. Two validated instruments (SF-36 and EQ-5D) were sent to 86 patients with a 72% response rate (44 men, 18 women). As reference, 2721 individuals (1292 men, 1429 women; 59% response rate) from the general population responded to the same QOL instruments. Results. Compared to the general population, QOL was significantly more affected in patients with polyneuropathy concerning motor functions, with 42% of the patients reporting problems with walking, 7% having difficulties with washing and dressing, and 31% having problems with usual activities (work, study, household work, and family or leisure activities). The EQ-5D results showed that 85% of the patients were suffering from pain compared to 56% of the general population. Mental health was preserved among patients with polyneuropathy. Mobility was declining with increasing age in patients, but was not affected by disease duration. Conclusions. Our study showed that patients with cryptogenic polyneuropathy have a lower QOL compared to the general population, although mental health scores did not differ between the groups. This information may be helpful when explaining the disease and its impact on newly diagnosed patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare , 2011. Vol. 33, no 7, 617-623 p.
Keyword [en]
Activities of daily living, EuroQol, polyneuropathy, neurological disease, neuropathy
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67316DOI: 10.3109/09638288.2010.505996ISI: 000287451200008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-67316DiVA: diva2:409383
Available from: 2011-04-08 Created: 2011-04-08 Last updated: 2011-10-10
In thesis
1. Cryptogenic Polyneuropathy: Clinical, Environmental, And Genetic Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cryptogenic Polyneuropathy: Clinical, Environmental, And Genetic Studies
2011 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The purpose of this medical thesis was to describe the clinical and neurophysiological features and to evaluate the health related quality of life (HR-QoL) in patients with cryptogenic polyneuropathy. We also wanted to investigate different occupational, and leisure time exposures as determinants for cryptogenic polyneuropathy, and to analyze whether polymorphisms for the null alleles of Glutathione S-Transferase Mu-1 (GSTM1), and Theta-1 (GSTT1), and a low activity genetic variation of epoxide hydrolase (EPHX) affect the risk of developing polyneuropathy. These genes were chosen because their enzymes are important in the metabolism of toxic compounds.

Methods: The medical records of all patients aged 40–79 years with the diagnosis of cryptogenic polyneuropathy from 1993 to 2000 were analyzed, and data regarding clinical symptoms, laboratory findings, and neurophysiological findings at diagnosis were collected. 255 cases were found. When the medical records were reevaluated assessment to a protocol 168 patients remained as cryptogenic. Two validated instruments (SF-36 and EQ-5D) for measuring HR-QoL were sent to patients, and a reference group from the general population. Additional clinical information, and data on occupational, and leisure time exposure was obtained from postal questionnaires. Crude odds ratios (COR), and logistic regression odds ratios (LOR) were calculated for exposures with five or more exposed cases and referents taken together. We also tested for genetic polymorphisms of GSTM1 and GSTT1, and epoxide hydrolase exon three, EPHX*3.

Results: 68% of the patients were men. The mean age at first symptom was 61 years and at diagnosis 64 years. Distal numbness was the most common symptom, but pain, pedal paresthesias, and impairment of balance were also common. The most common clinical findings were decreased or lost proprioception or sense of vibration (80%), and loss of ankle jerks (78%). Neurography showed mixed sensorimotor polyneuropathy of axonal or mixed axonal and demyelinating type. QOL was significantly affected concerning motor functions, with 42% of the patients reporting problems to walk, 3% having problems with daily activities, and 85% were suffering from pain. Mental health was preserved. Mobility was declining with increasing age, but was not affected by disease duration. Increased risks were found in men for occupational exposure to sulphur dioxide, xylene, methyl ethyl ketone, and herbicides and in women for occupational exposure to lead, nitrous oxide, and insecticides. Interaction between occupational and leisure time exposure were seen for several exposures. No significant correlation was found between GSTM1, GSTT1, and EPHX1 polymorphisms in patients with cryptogenic polyneuropathy compared with controls. A tendency, however, was seen for the GSTT1 null phenotype, which was enhanced among smokers compared to controls (OR 3.7).

Conclusions: Cryptogenic polyneuropathy is a slowly progressive sensorimotor nerve lesion of mainly axonal type. Patients with cryptogenic polyneuropathy have a lower QOL compared to the general population, although mental health scores did not differ between the groups. Our results show that known determinants could be confirmed, but also some new appeared i.e. sulphur dioxide, hydrogen sulphide, fungicides, and vibrations in the feet. Moreover our results point to a synergistic effect of various exposures. Our hypothesis is that the GSTT1 null polymorphism may be related to an impaired metabolism of toxic substances and reactive oxygen that could lead to nerve damage in the peripheral nervous system. Our results are indicating that components in cigarette smoke might increase the risk of axonal neuropathy in genetically predisposed patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2011. 12´2 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1249
Keyword
Neuropathy
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-71215 (URN)978-91-7393-118-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2011-10-28, Victoriasalen, Plan 10, Huvudblocket, Campus US, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2011-10-10 Created: 2011-10-06 Last updated: 2015-06-05Bibliographically approved

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Persson, BodilVrethem, Magnus

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