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Are There Any Matthew Effects in Literacy and Cognitive Development?
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning and Didactic Science in Education and School (PeDiUS). Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning and Didactic Science in Education and School (PeDiUS). Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Learning and Didactic Science in Education and School (PeDiUS). Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
2011 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, ISSN 0031-3831, Vol. 55, no 2, 181-196 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Matthew effect is often used as a metaphor to describe a widening gap between good

and poor readers over time. In this study we examined the development of individual

differences in reading and cognitive functioning in children with reading difficulties and

normal readers from Grades 1 to 3. Matthew effects were observed for individual

differences in reading comprehension and vocabulary, but not on tests measuring word

decoding, word recognition, or spelling, nor on non-verbal ability. However, these

Matthew effects disappeared when controlling for home literacy activities and parent

reading behavior, indicating that print exposure is one environmental condition involved

in mediating Matthew effects. These findings are in line with the idea of the Matthew

effect by Stanovich and the core assumption that reading comprehension is involved in

a reciprocal relationship with vocabulary knowledge.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London UK: Routledge , 2011. Vol. 55, no 2, 181-196 p.
Keyword [en]
literacy and cognitive development, Matthew effects, reading comprehension, vocabulary
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67525DOI: 10.1080/00313831.2011.554699ISI: 000289582500005OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-67525DiVA: diva2:411131
Available from: 2011-04-15 Created: 2011-04-15 Last updated: 2017-12-11

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Kempe, CamillaEriksson Gustavsson, Anna-LenaSamuelsson, Stefan

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Kempe, CamillaEriksson Gustavsson, Anna-LenaSamuelsson, Stefan
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Learning and Didactic Science in Education and School (PeDiUS)Faculty of Educational Sciences
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  • de-DE
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