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Propofol alters vesicular transport in rat cortical neuronalcultures
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
2011 (English)In: Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, ISSN 0867-5910, E-ISSN 1899-1505, Vol. 62, no 1, 119-124 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Neuronal intracellular transport is performed by motor proteins, which deliver vesicles, organelles and proteins along cytoskeletal tracks inside the neuron. We have previously shown that the anesthetic propofol causes dose- and time-dependent, reversible retraction of neuronal neurites. We hypothesize that propofol alters the vesicular transport of cortical neurons due to this neurite retraction. Primary cultures of co-cultivated rat cortical neurons and glial cells were exposed to either 2 mu M propofol, control medium or the lipid vehicle, in time-response experiments. Reversibility was tested by washing propofol off the cells. The role of the GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R) was assessed with the GABA(A)R antagonist gabazine. Vesicles were tracked using differential interference contrast video microscopy. Propofol caused a retrograde movement in 83.4 +/- 5.2% (mean +/- S.E.M.) of vesicles, which accelerated over the observed time course (0.025 +/- 0.012 mu m.s(-1)). In control medium, vesicles moved predominantly anterograde (84.6 +/- 11.1%) with lower velocity (0.011 +/- 0.004 mu m.s(-1)). Cells exposed to the lipid vehicle showed the same dynamic characteristics as cells in control medium. The propofol-induced effect on vesicle transport was reversible and blocked by the GABA(A)R antagonist gabazine in low concentration. Our results show that propofol causes a reversible, accelerating vesicle movement toward the neuronal cell body that is mediated via synaptic GABA(A)R. We have previously reported that propofol initiates neurite retraction, and we propose that propofol causes vesicle movement by retrograde flow of cytoplasm from the narrowed neurite.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Polish Physiological Society , 2011. Vol. 62, no 1, 119-124 p.
Keyword [en]
anesthetics intravenously, brain, cellular mechanism, cerebral cortex, neurotransmission effects, pharmacology, propofol, theories of anesthetic action, vesicular transport
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67967ISI: 000289542300014OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-67967DiVA: diva2:414735
Available from: 2011-05-04 Created: 2011-05-04 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Propofol changes the cytoskeletal function in neurons: An experimental study in cortical cultures
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Propofol changes the cytoskeletal function in neurons: An experimental study in cortical cultures
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Every day, general anaesthetics are given to a large number of patients around the world but the cellular mechanisms of how anaesthetics act are still not clear. General anaesthetics cause the intended unconsciousness, amnesia and immobility in patients, but also side effects such as a decrease in mean arterial pressure and arrhythmia, both of which contribute to complications such as heart damage and stroke. With more knowledge of the mechanism of anaesthetic drugs, these complications could be reduced.

It has been shown that anaesthetics cause a disruption of the thalamocortical connectivity and brain network connectivity. How the network communication is disrupted however is not known. Propofol and thiopental are both intravenous anaesthetic drugs used widely in clinical anaesthesia. They bind to the GABAA receptor and enhance its function.

The cytoskeleton helps the cell to maintain its shape and participate in cellular movement and transport. Cellular transport to and from a neuron’s cell body and periphery is performed by motor proteins that move vesicles, organelles and proteins along cytoskeletal tracks. We have previously shown that propofol causes a reorganisation of the cytoskeleton protein actin in neurons, but we were further interested to study the effects of propofol and thiopental on the cytoskeletal function of cultured cortical rat neurons.

Our results show that propofol and thiopental cause neurite (axon and dendrite) retraction. Propofol’s effects were time- and dose-dependent, and can be reversed when propofol is removed. We were able to inhibit propofolinduced neurite retraction if we stabilised actin by blocking either the motor protein myosin II or the GABAA receptor. We have previously shown that a small GTP-binding protein, RhoA, inhibits propofol-caused actin reorganisation. Propofol-induced neurite retraction was mediated via a downstream effector of RhoA, ROK, which induces phosphorylation of the myosin light chain and increases contractility. Furthermore, we have shown that propofol causes a switch from anterograde to retrograde transport and increases the average velocity of the moving vesicles in neurites. The propofol induced retrograde vesicle transport was GABAA receptor-mediated.

Orexin A is a neuropeptide which regulates the sleep/awake cycle and has also been shown to reduce anaesthesia in animals when given intracerebroventricularly. We found that orexin A reverses propofol and thiopental-induced neurite retraction and actin reorganisation. Moreover, we have shown that the orexin A inhibition of propofol-induced neurite retraction is mediated via the PLD/PKC intracellular signalling pathway. Propofol and thiopental decreased the tyrosine phosphorilation of the intermediate cytoskeletal protein vimentin which is reversed by orexin A.

Taken together, these results suggest that propofol causes a time- and dose-dependent, reversible and GABAAreceptor-mediated neurite retraction in cultured cortical rat neurons. Propofol also causes a switch from anterograde to retrograde vesicle transport in neurites. Orexin A reverses propofol and thiopental-induced neurite retraction and cytoskeletal reorganisation. Orexin A inhibits propofol-induced neurite retraction via the PLD/PKC intracellular signalling pathway.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012. 64 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1305
Keyword
Propofol, cytoskeleton
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Basic Medicine Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-77219 (URN)978-91-7519-910-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-06-08, Berzeliussalen, Hälsouniversitetet, Campus US, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2012-06-04 Created: 2012-05-08 Last updated: 2012-06-04Bibliographically approved

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Turina, DeanBjörnström-Karlsson, KarinSundqvist, TommyEintrei, Christina

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