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Driver acceptance of pedestrian alerts by a night vision system
Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
2011 (English)In: Human Factors, ISSN 0018-7208Article in journal (Other academic) Submitted
Abstract [en]

Objective: We investigated driver acceptance of alerts to pedestrian alerts issued by a night vision active safety system with pedestrian detection functionality using a method that leverages scarce and expensive field operational test data.

Background: Driver acceptance of automotive active safety systems is a key factor to promote system use and implies a need for a method to assess factors influencing driver acceptance.

Method: In a field operational test, ten drivers drove instrumented vehicles equipped with a preproduction night vision system with pedestrian detection software. In a follow-up experiment, the 10 drivers and 25 additional volunteers without experience with the system watched 57 clips with pedestrian encounters gathered during the field operational test. They rated the acceptance of an alert to each pedestrian encounter.

Results: Levels of rating concordance were significant between drivers who experienced the encounters and participants who did not. Two contextual variables, pedestrian location and motion, were found to influence ratings.

Conclusion: The subjective acceptance rating method provides consistent measures of acceptance in a controlled environment and makes it possible to leverage expensive field operational test data within the confines of the laboratory.

Application: The study identifies sources of contextual sensitivity to alerts issued by an active safety system and demonstrates the utility of using subjective driver acceptance criteria to inform active safety system design.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011.
Keyword [en]
Alert acceptance, active safety systems, knowledge elicitation, driver behavior, automation.
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-68105OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-68105DiVA: diva2:416288
Available from: 2011-05-11 Created: 2011-05-11 Last updated: 2011-05-16Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Using False Alarms when Developing Automotive Active Safety Systems
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using False Alarms when Developing Automotive Active Safety Systems
2011 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis develops and tests an empirical method to quantifying drivers’ level of acceptance for alerts issued by automotive active safety systems. The method uses drivers’ subjective level of acceptance for alerts that are literally false alarms as a measure to guide the development of alerting criteria that can be used by active safety systems. Design for driver acceptance aims at developing systems that overcome drivers’ dislike for false alarms by issuing alerts only when drivers finds them reasonable and therefore are likely to accept them. The method attempts to bridge the gap between field experiments with a high level of ecological validity and lab based experiments with a high level of experimental control. By presenting subjects with video recordings of field data (e.g., traffic incidents and other situations of interest), the method retains high levels of both experimental control and ecological validity.

This thesis first develops the theoretical arguments for the view that false alarms are not only unavoidable, but also that some false alarms are actually useful and, hence, desirable as they provide useful information that can be used (by the proposed method) to assess driver acceptance of active safety systems. The second part of this thesis consists of a  series of empirical studies that demonstrates the application of the assessment method. The three empirical studies showed that drivers’ subjective level of acceptance for alerts that are literally false alarms are a useful measure that can guide system designers in defining activation criteria for active safety systems. The method used to collect the driver’s subjective acceptance levels has also been shown to produce reliable and reproducible data that align with the view of the drivers who experienced the situations in the field. By eliciting responses from a large number of observers, we leverage the high cost of field data and generate sample sizes that are amenable to statistical tests of significance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2011. 58 p.
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Dissertations, ISSN 0345-7524 ; 1374
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-68109 (URN)978-91-7393-153-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2011-05-26, Visionen, hus B,, Campus Valla, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2011-05-11 Created: 2011-05-11 Last updated: 2011-05-11Bibliographically approved

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Källhammer, Jan-ErikSmith, Kip

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