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Asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease: is pharmacological prevention of cardiovascular risk cost-effective?
Karolinska Institute.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Karlstad Hospital.
Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Thoracic Surgery.
2011 (English)In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR PREVENTION and REHABILITATION, ISSN 1741-8267, Vol. 18, no 2, 254-261 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is associated with an increased risk of early death in cardiovascular (CV) disease. The majority of PAD subjects are asymptomatic with a prevalence of 11 per cent among the elderly. Long-term drug prevention aiming to minimize disease progression and CV events in these subjects is probably beneficial, but expensive. The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of pharmacological risk reduction in subclinical PAD. Long-term costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were estimated by employing a decision-analytic model for ACE-inhibitor, statin, aspirin and non-aspirin anti-platelet therapy. Rates of CV events without treatment were derived from epidemiological studies and event rate reduction were retrieved from clinical trials. Costs and health-related quality of life estimates were obtained from published sources. All four drugs reduced CV events. Using ACE-inhibition resulted in a heart rate (HR) of 0.67 (95% CI: 0.55-0.79), statins 0.74 (0.70-0.79), and clopidogrel 0.72 (0.43-1.00). Aspirin had a HR of 0.87 and the 95% CI passed included one (0.72-1.03). ACE-inhibition was associated with the largest reduction in events leading to the highest gain in QALYs (7.95). Furthermore, ACE-inhibitors were associated with the lowest mean cost (sic)40.556. In conclusion, while all drugs reduced CV events, ACE-inhibition was the most cost-effective. These results suggest that we should consider efforts to identify patients with asymptomatic PAD and, when identified, offer ACE-inhibition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams and Wilkins , 2011. Vol. 18, no 2, 254-261 p.
Keyword [en]
Cost-benefit analysis, peripheral vascular disease, pharmacological prevention
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-68224DOI: 10.1177/1741826710389368ISI: 000289895800016OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-68224DiVA: diva2:416860
Available from: 2011-05-13 Created: 2011-05-13 Last updated: 2012-03-15

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Henriksson, MartinWahlberg, Eric

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Health Technology Assessment and Health EconomicsFaculty of Health SciencesDepartment of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in ÖstergötlandThoracic Surgery
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