liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of cognitive-behavioral therapy for tinnitus distress
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4753-6745
2011 (English)In: CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY REVIEW, ISSN 0272-7358, Vol. 31, no 4, 545-553 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tinnitus is defined as a sound in the ear(s) and/or head without external origin and is a serious health concern for millions worldwide. The aim of the present study was to determine whether Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) is effective in reducing distress associated with tinnitus. Randomized, controlled trials that assessed the efficacy of CBT for tinnitus-related distress in adults were identified by searching electronic databases (PsychINFO, PubMed, the Cochrane Library), and by manual searches. Fifteen studies (total of 1091 participants) were included in the meta-analysis. CBT compared with a passive and active control at post-assessment yielded statistically significant mean effect sizes for tinnitus-specific measures (Hedgess g = 0.70. and Hedgess g = 0.44, respectively). The average weighted pre-to-follow-up effect size for the CBT group suggested that these effects were maintained over time. Smaller but yet statistically significant effects of CBT were found for mood outcome measures. Characteristics of the studies were unrelated to effect sizes. Methodological rigor, publication bias, and a series of sensitivity analyses did not influence the findings. The results suggest that CBT is an effective treatment of tinnitus distress. However, caution is warranted given that few large-scale, well-controlled trials were identified.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. , 2011. Vol. 31, no 4, 545-553 p.
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-68348DOI: 10.1016/j.cpr.2010.12.006ISI: 000289920900004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-68348DiVA: diva2:418138
Available from: 2011-05-20 Created: 2011-05-20 Last updated: 2014-11-28

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records BETA

Hesser, HugoWeise, CorneliaZetterqvist Westin, VendelaAndersson, Gerhard

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hesser, HugoWeise, CorneliaZetterqvist Westin, VendelaAndersson, Gerhard
By organisation
Department of Behavioural Sciences and LearningFaculty of Arts and SciencesThe Swedish Institute for Disability ResearchDisability ResearchFaculty of Educational SciencesClinical and Social Psychology
Social Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 356 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf