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Editorial: Getting into the Habit
Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. (The Posthumanities Hub)
Centre for Women's Studies, Umeå University, Sweden.
Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7932-2867
2011 (English)In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 19, no 3, 3 p.141-143 p.Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

In this issue of NORA we present three original articles on three diverse topics by authors from three different countries. The first article in this issue concerns popular therapeutic culture, such as self-help books, TV programmes, and Internet resources, that help us make sense of the ideal of “the good couple”. In this article, Sara Eldén argues that the cultural narratives of “the good couple” both reproduce and resist stereotypes. This is true not least with reference to gender and gender inequality. The second article, an Icelandic piece by Anna Karlsdóttir and Audur H. Ingólfsdóttir, maps out the demographic changes in a rural Icelandic village and the gendered outcome of such socio-economic rearrangements. The third article, by Ingrid Guldvik, grapples with the pros and cons of the introduction and adoption of gender quotas. She explores and evaluates the criteria that form the basis for a strong  gender quota regime in the Norwegian context of local politics.

This issue’s Taking Turns text, “Feminist Theory and that Critical Edge”, by Icelandic anthropologist Kristín Loftsdóttir, highlights the need for self-positioning in feminist theorizing and research in order to nourish the critical edge that remains so essential to feminist studies. In her text she underlines the importance of being careful with how we use central concepts, such as “gender equality”, especially in relation to fields such as international development and peace-keeping, as well as research addressing multiculturalism. These are all fields where Loftsdo´ ttir sees profound risks of reproducing colonizing discourses and relationships, not least in the Nordic countries, which have often been misperceived as standing outside the history of colonialism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Taylor and Francis: Routledge Journals , 2011, 3. Vol. 19, no 3, 3 p.141-143 p.
Keyword [en]
scholarly writing, performative writing, creative writing, writing for publication
National Category
Gender Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-71600DOI: 10.1080/08038740.2011.594030OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-71600DiVA: diva2:451176
Available from: 2011-10-25 Created: 2011-10-25 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Åsberg, CeciliaKoobak, Redi

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