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Swedish midwives’ views on severe fear of childbirth
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
2011 (English)In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 2, no 4, 153-159 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

To describe the views of Swedish midwives on severe fear of childbirth (SFOC).

Study design

In this cross sectional study, a random sample of 1000 midwives, selected from the database of the Swedish Association of Midwives, received a questionnaire. The response rate was 84% (n = 834), with 726 questionnaires included in the final analysis.

Main outcome measures

The views of midwives on SFOC in different contexts of work: antenatal care clinic (ACC), labour ward (LW) either ACC/LW or Neither-Nor ACC/LW.

Results

The majority of respondents thought that the frequency of SFOC has increased during the last 10 years (67%), and that pregnant women today are more likely to discuss their fears (70%). Midwives at ACCs thought that special education in SFOC is needed (p < 0.001) and that they have more responsibility to identify women with SFOC (p < 0.001) than midwives at LWs. The majority of respondents, both at ACCs (60%) and LWs (65%), intuitively sensed when they were meeting a woman with SFOC. Opinions among midwives who alternate between working in ACCs and LWs reflected the views of the midwives working either in an ACC or an LW.

Conclusions

The views of midwives on SFOC are partly in concordance and partly contradictory in relation to the different workplaces as well as research data. Knowledge of the views of midwives on SFOC is a necessary pre-requisite to improve care for pregnant women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 2, no 4, 153-159 p.
Keyword [en]
Anxiety, Fear of childbirth, Midwives, Views
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-73549DOI: 10.1016/j.srhc.2011.07.002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-73549DiVA: diva2:474353
Available from: 2012-01-09 Created: 2012-01-09 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Fear is in the air: Midwives´ perspectives of fear of childbirth and childbirth self-efficacy and fear of childbirth in nulliparous pregnant women
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fear is in the air: Midwives´ perspectives of fear of childbirth and childbirth self-efficacy and fear of childbirth in nulliparous pregnant women
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: In Western countries, about one pregnant woman in five experiences a considerable fear of childbirth (FOC). Consequently FOC is an important topic for midwives, being pregnant women’s main care givers. Also, although many aspects of FOC have been studied, almost no studies have into detail applied a theoretical frame of reference for studying pregnant women’s expectations for their upcoming labour and delivery. Therefore, the theory of self-efficacy, here regarding pregnant women’s belief in own capability to cope with labour and delivery, has been applied with the aim to better understand the phenomenon of FOC.

Aim: The overall aims of the thesis were to describe midwives´ perceptions and views on FOC and to expand the current knowledge about expectations for the forthcoming birth in nulliparous women in the context of FOC.

Method: Study I had a descriptive design. In total 21 midwives, distributed over four focus-groups, participated. Data were analysed by the phenomenographic approach. Studies II and III had cross sectional designs. Study II comprised 726 midwives, randomly selected from a national sample that completed a questionnaire that addressed the findings from Study I. Study III included 423 pregnant nulliparous women. FOC was measured using the Wijma Delivery Expectancy/Experience Questionnaire (W-DEQ), self-efficacy by the Childbirth Self-Efficacy Inventory (CBSEI). Study IV had a descriptive interpretative design. Seventeen women with severe FOC were conveniently selected from the sample of Study III and individually interviewed. Content analyses, both deductive and inductive, were performed.

Method: Study I had a descriptive design. In total 21 midwives, distributed over four focus-groups, participated. Data were analysed by the phenomenographic approach. Studies II and III had cross sectional designs. Study II comprised 726 midwives, randomly selected from a national sample that completed a questionnaire that addressed the findings from Study I. Study III included 423 pregnant nulliparous women. FOC was measured using the Wijma Delivery Expectancy/Experience Questionnaire (W-DEQ), self-efficacy by the Childbirth Self-Efficacy Inventory (CBSEI). Study IV had a descriptive interpretative design. Seventeen women with severe FOC were conveniently selected from the sample of Study III and individually interviewed. Content analyses, both deductive and inductive, were performed.

Conclusions: Swedish midwives regard severe FOC as a serious problem that influences pregnant women’s view on the forthcoming labour and delivery. Midwives at antenatal care clinics, compared to colleagues working at labour wards, experience a greater need for training in care of pregnant women with severe FOC. Self-efficacy is a useful construct and the self-efficacy theory an applicable way of thinking in analysing fear of childbirth. The self-efficacy concept might be appropriate in midwives’ care for women with severe FOC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012. 75 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1334
Keyword
Anxiety; Childbirth; Content analysis; Fear; Focus-group interview; Midwives; Self-efficacy; Phenomenography; W-DEQ; CBSEI
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-85650 (URN)978-91-7519-780-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-12-14, Berzeliussalen, Hälsouniversitetet, Campus US, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 09:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2012-11-27 Created: 2012-11-27 Last updated: 2012-11-27Bibliographically approved

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Salomonsson, BirgittaAlehagen, SiwWijma, Klaas

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